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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 12
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 12. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 12. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2217

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 12, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_028.jpg
Transcript l2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Proceeding southward along Armenian Street, we have on the right the fine gardens of the Armenian Monastery, and on the left the monastery itself, and the Church of St. James The monastery is the largest and most comfortable building of its class in Jerusalem, and has attached to it, schools and dormitories for the accommodation of students preparing themselves for the priesthood, and also an extensive range of buildings capable of containing three thousand pilgrims. It was founded by the Georgians as early as the eleventh century, but when their fortunes declined and they were unable to satisfy the claims made upon them by the Turks it was sold by them to the Armenians in the fifteenth century. The Georgians attached as a condition to the sale that the monastery should be restored to them when they were ao-ain able to support it; and upon this condition the Greek Church has based a claim to the buildings, which may some day swell into one of those quarrels respecting the holy places which have led to such serious consequences. The refectory or dining-hall of the monastery retains much of its old character—a step divides the patriarch and bishops from the rest of the clergy; the tables are fine slabs of white marble ; the pavement is of what is known as " Santa Croce " marble; there is some pretty inlaid work; and on the walls, amidst much that is modern, are some fine old porcelain tiles. The Church of St. James is, with the exception of that of the Holy Sepulchre, the largest within the city, and is the richest in gilding, decoration, and pictures. On the north side of the church is a chapel dedicated to St. Stephen, in which is preserved the font used on the occasion of the baptism of the first Jew converted to Christianity. The walls of the church and its chapels are covered with porcelain tiles of comparatively modern date and of inferior pattern. A short distance beyond the monastery is the Zion Gate, or the Gate of the Prophet David, Bab en Neby Daud (see page 10), leading out to the group of buildings called Neby Daud, which stand on the waste portion of the modern Mount Zion (see page n). The gate itself dates from the reconstruction of the walls by Suleiman in 1539—42 a.d. Close to the Zion Gate is an Armenian monastery called the House of Caiaphas, in which are shown the prison of Our Lord and the stone that once closed the Holy Sepulchre. In the quadrangle of the monastery are the tombs of the Armenian patriarchs of Jerusalem. A short distance beyond are the " coenaculum," or chamber of the Last Supper, and the Tomb of David, contained in one building. The tomb, or cenotaph shown as such, occupies the eastern end of a chamber which appears to have been the crypt of an old church erected during the Frank kingdom of Jerusalem, probably that called the Church of St. Mary. We must now return to the market-place in front of the Jaffa Gate, and, proceeding for a short distance eastward down David Street, turn to the left into the street of the Christians to gain the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Passing along this last street, we have, at first, on the left the large reservoir known as Hezekiah's Pool, and on the right the Greek Church and Monastery of St. John the Baptist. Hezekiah's Pool, or, as it is called by the people, " The Pool of the Patriarch's Bath," is an open tank surrounded by houses, which is supplied with