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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 7
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 7. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2212.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 7. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2212

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 7, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2212.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_023.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 7 vicinity of the Zion Gate, whilst another, named " El Wad," or Valley Street, follows, except where it has to cross the causeway, the general direction of the Tyropoeon Valley to the Dung Gate. From St. Stephen's Gate a street runs past the Pool of Bethesda to the Valley Street, and from the Zion Gate a street leads in an almost direct line to an open space in front of the Jaffa Gate. The principal streets divide Jerusalem, approximately, into four quarters, of which the north-east, including Bezetha and the Upper Tyropoeon Valley, is occupied by Moslems ; the north-west and south-west, or Zion and the western hills, by Christians ; and the south-east, comprising the eastern slope of Zion and the Lower Tyropoeon, by Jews. The Jaffa Gate, or Gate of Hebron (Bab el Khalil), is the principal entrance to the city, and its immediate neighbourhood is generally enlivened by a throng of passers-by, and by the groups of muleteers, packers, and idlers who spend a large portion of their time lounging about the cafes without the gate (see page i). South of the Jaffa Gate is the Citadel, and beyond it are the barracks and the extensive gardens of the Armenian monastery (see page 5). This portion of the western hill was covered in part, or perhaps entirely, by Herod's Palace, with its gardens, and by the three towers which adjoined it on the north. Josephus has left us a glowing account of the royal palace, which " was entirely surrounded by a wall thirty cubits high, with decorated towers at equal intervals, and contained enormous banqueting halls, besides numerous chambers richly adorned." The towers were built of blocks of white stone of great size, "so exactly joined together that each tower appeared to be one mass of rock; " and they played a prominent part during the memorable siege by the Romans. These towers were left standing by Titus when he destroyed the city, to protect the legion left to garrison the place and prevent any insurrectionary movements on the part of the Jews. Any remains which may now exist of Herod's Palace are buried beneath a mass of rubbish more than thirty feet deep; but two at least of the towers, Phasaelus and Hippicus, can be recognised in the works of the modern Citadel. . The Citadel, remodelled in the fourteenth century, and again repaired in the sixteenth century, consists of five square towers and other buildings, surrounded by a ditch (see page 3). It has a commanding position, and before the introduction of fire-arms must have been of great strength. Even now the solid masonry of the lower portion would resist for some time any artillery that could be brought against it. The Tower of David (see page 5) appears to be the oldest portion of the Citadel, and its dimensions and mode of construction a^ree well with those of the tower Phasaelus as described by Josephus. The substructure consists of a solid masonry escarp, rising from the bottom of the ditch at an angle of about forty-five degrees, with a pathway, or chemin des rondes, round the top. Above this the tower rises in a solid mass for a height of twenty-nine feet, and then comes the superstructure. The escarp retains to some extent its original appearance, but time and hard treatment have worn away much of the finer work, and the repairs have been executed in the usual slovenly manner of the Turks. The old work, where it can be