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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 4
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 4. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 4. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2208

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 4, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_019.jpg
Transcript 4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. "gazing up into heaven" (Acts i. u); and still farther northward is Scopus, the brow of the hill whence Titus and his legions looked down upon the doomed city (see Frontispiece). The ride from Scopus along the crest of Olivet to the Church of the Ascension is one of the greatest interest and 'beauty: on one side there are ever-changing views of the deep depression of the Jordan Valley and the Dead Sea; on the other, every step brings more prominently to view some spot, or it may be some building, which no thoughtful man can look upon without at least a passing emotion. The view from the Mount of Olives is one which, from its strange beauty and its extraordinary interest, lingers long and lovingly in the memory of those who have seen it. Away to the north is the minaret-crowned height of Neby Samwil, the Mizpeh, perhaps, of Scripture, whence many a weary pilgrim has caught his first glimpse of the long-looked-for Zion. To the east are grey, bare hills, cut up by a thousand ravines, which descend abruptly to the Jordan Valley, and that strange salt sea which occupies the deepest depression of the earth's surface. The atmosphere is so clear, so transparent, that the placid water seems at times almost within reach, yet it is many miles away, and its surface is no less than three thousand nine hundred feet below the mount. Beyond the Jordan Valley and the Dead Sea, a long mountain wall, which is broken here and there by wild gorges through which the waters of Arnon and other streams find their way to the lower depths, extends from Mount Gilead on the north to the Mountains of Moab on the south (see page 9). In the evening, when the sun is low and the blinding glare from the white hills in the foreground is somewhat subdued, the colouring on the distant mountains is exquisite, and the changing light produces a succession of ever-varying tints which it would be impossible to transfer to canvas. The view towards the west, which should-be seen by morning light, embraces the entire city of Jerusalem; every hill and valley and nearly all the important buildings can be recognised at once, and a general impression of their relative positions obtained. Looking down from his vantage ground on Olivet, the spectator is at once struck by the appearance of ruin and decay which the city presents, and especially by the vast accumulation of rubbish within and around it: the deep gorge of the Tyropceon, which cut through the heart of the town, is now but a slight depression; the wild ravine in which the Pool of Bethesda was cut is filled to overflowing; Kedron's bed is deeply covered with debris; the precipices which Joab scaled are slopes of earth and stones planted with corn and vegetables; and the Via Dolorosa is forty to fifty feet above the level of the ancient roadway. The extensive cemeteries which hem in the city on almost every side give a mournful aspect to the view, and this effect is heightened by the oppressive silence which broods over the place during the greater portion of the day, and by the sober grey of the dome-roofed houses. How strangely changed from that Jerusalem which the Psalmist once described in loving terms as " Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth !" From the Church of the Ascension the ground shelves down to the dry bed of the Kedron and then rises steeply to the summit of Mount Moriah, on which is now situated the