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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page viii
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page viii. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page viii. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2203

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page viii, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page viii
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_014.jpg
Transcript viii INTRODUCTION. travels, are well-nigh countless. Their books are amongst the least worthy of the noble theme of any that have appeared on this or any other country. But the class which may be called scientific have more or less kept before their minds the ideal which advanced knowledge and the seriousness of the subject demanded; and it is to their work that this volume is chiefly owing! It represents the results of their travels—in Egypt, so far as it concerns the Chosen People; in Arabia, so far as Arabia is connected with the giving of the Law and the wanderings of the Israelites; in Palestine, as it includes not only the sacred history, both Jewish and Christian, but also the monuments of the Crusaders and the Saracen princes of a later time. The engravings and the descriptions must be left to speak for themselves. A few words only need here be added to express the value of such an addition to our knowledge of the Holy Land, or rather, we may say, of the Holy Lands. Of Egypt it is enough to say that its transitory connection with the slavery and migration of the children of Israel, although very slightly indicated in the Egyptian history or monuments, yet deserves any light which can be thrown by the recent investigations which have taken place with regard to Heliopolis or the neighbourhood of Suez. The desert of Mount Sinai is more closely bound up with the sacred history. A few incidents in the wanderings of the Chosen People, the identification of Paran and of the Giving of the Law with the magnificent scenery of Serbal and the Gebel Mousa, and the conjectural identification of Petra with Kadesh, or, at any rate, with Mount Hor, furnish the only links of direct relationship ; but the general atmosphere, the natural history, and the unique configuration of the granite mountains which form the peculiar charm of the desert, cannot fail to quicken the appreciation with which we read the accounts of the "great and terrible wilderness," and the thunders and lightnings of Mount Horeb, the palm-trees of Elim, and the springs of Rephidim and Kadesh. But in Palestine the connection of the history and the geography is so intimate and so compact as to exceed that of any other country, with the exception of Greece. The beauty, the variety, the marked features of the Grecian landscape, cannot be rivalled by any other part of the world, and are so interwoven with every stage of the mythology and history of the marvellous people which inhabited it, as to place its historical geography in a superlative degree above that of any other nation or locality. Next to Greece, however, Palestine stands supreme. The extraordinary rift of the Jordan valley, deeper than any similar fissure on the surface of the earth, the innumerable questions, historical or scientific, which that valley suggests in the overthrow of the five cities in the passage of the Jordan, would of itself render Palestine peculiar amongst the countries of