Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Scraps from an artist's sketchbook
Page 62
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 62. 1877. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2074.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1877). Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 62. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2074

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 62, 1877, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2074.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Scraps from an artist's sketchbook
Alternative Title Scraps from an artist's sketch book, with illustrations from the author's original sketches in Rome, Florence, and Venice , photographed by J. Greer, Pendleton
Creator (Local)
  • Rothwell, Selim
Contributor (Local)
  • Pendleton, J. Greer
Publisher Daily Chronicle
Date 1877
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Artists
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Rome, Italy
  • Florence, Italy
  • Venice, Italy
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 118 pages; 12 leaves; 19 cm
Original Item Location DG427 .R68 1877
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2395052~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_003
Item Description
Title Page 62
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_003_078.jpg
Transcript 62 FLORENCE. was working in the Palace Gardens of the Medici, as a mason's assistant, and having found a piece of old marble, a portion of a balustrade, with a shield upon it, which had been thrown aside, commenced cutting out this mask, and was thus found employed by Lorenzo de Medici, who at once saw the great talent of young Angelo, took him under his charge, and gave him his son as a companion, and from this fostering care rose the genius who created the Moses and the David, works which it is impossible for us to write upon ; any words we could use would fall so short of giving an idea of their power and grandeur. The David formerly stood at the door of the Palazzio Vecchio. It was thought to be suffering from long exposure to the weather, and was removed to the Gallery of Fine Arts, where we had the pleasure of seeing it a few days ago in a temporary building, but on the site it will in future occupy in a magnificent gallery, worthy of such a matchless production that will be looked at for all time as the greatest work of the sculptor, who alone rivalled Phidias. With this digression we