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Scraps from an artist's sketchbook
Page 39
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Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 39. 1877. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2048.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1877). Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 39. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2048

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Scraps from an artist's sketchbook - Page 39, 1877, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2135/show/2048.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scraps from an artist's sketchbook
Alternative Title Scraps from an artist's sketch book, with illustrations from the author's original sketches in Rome, Florence, and Venice , photographed by J. Greer, Pendleton
Creator (Local)
  • Rothwell, Selim
Contributor (Local)
  • Pendleton, J. Greer
Publisher Daily Chronicle
Date 1877
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Artists
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Rome, Italy
  • Florence, Italy
  • Venice, Italy
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 118 pages; 12 leaves; 19 cm
Original Item Location DG427 .R68 1877
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2395052~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_003
Item Description
Title Page 39
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_003_052.jpg
Transcript ROME. 30 ornamental carved frame, which had been sadly worm-eaten, but was now restored and re-gilt, a fit surrounding for so noble a work. Mr. Moore then led us into an inner room, where, placed on an easel, in a good light, was this small work of Raphael's, yet perhaps the greatest ever produced in the world— Apollo and Marsyas. The figure of Apollo standing with his lyre on the right of the picture is of the most perfect Greek type, finer, if possible, in drawing than the celebrated statue in the Vatican. The Sun God looks down with disdain upon his would-be rival, who, seated on a bank to the left, and with pipe in hand (a musical one), has challenged glorious Apollo. The defeated musician was, according to the terms of the agreement, to be flayed alive, and the vultures are seen descending to commence their work upon the unhappy Marsyas. This gem of art is in the most wonderful preservation, and in the early style of the artist. Some few artists have doubted its originality, but there is scarcely a great painter of the Italian, French, German, and English schools, who has not