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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page 46
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 46. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1910.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 46. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1910

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 46, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1910.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page 46
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_241.jpg
Transcript 46 CONSTANTINOPLE AND ITS ENVIRONS*, it left its own colour upon the tower, which it has ever since retained in memory of the event. The palace of the " Tersana emini," or master of the arsenal, next comes in view and the extensive and noble establishment over which he presides. The stores, docks, and other edifices connected with it, extend for nearly a mile and a half along the shores of the harbour. They are constructed of solid masonry, and contain rope-yards, and an hospital: 500 labourers, and the same number of slaves in chains, condemned for various offences, are daily at work there. The forests near the Black Sea furnish an inexhaustible supply of timber; hemp for cordage, and metal for ordinance, are ready in abundance in the neighbouring shores of Russia. Should any cause interrupt the communication, and render these resources unavailable, supplies of all kinds are found within the limits of the Ottoman empire. Negroponte sends pitch, tar, and rosin ; Sam- soun, hemp; Gallipoli^ and Salonichi, gunpowder. With these materials the Turks launch the largest ships in the world; but, manned by inferior crews, they are weak and worthless. They are seen riding before the arsenal, and among them the Mahmoud, supposed to be the largest .vessel of war ever built. She is 223 feet long, is pierced for 140 guns, some of her carronades carry sixty-pound balls, and her burden is 3,934 tons. During the Greek war, these vast machines suffered severely from the small-craft of their more skilful and active enemies; and such was the terror their brulots inspired, that the Turks did not consider their ships safe, even within the protection of their harbours. Each of them, therefore, was insulated by a pile of stakes, to which were moored rafts, where sentinels kept watch night and day, warning off even the smallest caique that approached. They were supplied with heaps of stones, piled on the rafts like cannon-balls, and pelted without mercy every incautious straggler that came within the reach of their missiles. On the water's edge, raised on piles, is seen the elegant edifice of the " Divan Hane," or Council Chamber of the Admiralty. It is a light and airy specimen of Oriental architecture, of which the Turks are vain. It was built by two ingenious Greek architects, who soon after disappeared. It was said they were put to death by their employers, lest they should build another to rival it. Besides, it is the " Caique Hane," or Arsenal of the Sultan's Barges : and near this, the quarters of " Galiongees," or Marines. These soldiers of the fleet are distinguished by the richness and gaiety of their dress, and by the assumption and insolence of their demeanour. In the rear of the arsenal appears the tower of Galata, shooting up its tall spire above the hills, that its vigilant sentinel should command a view of whatever fire may burst out, and its beacon-drum may be heard far and near, whenever it announces one to the Bektchi, who, with his iron-shod pole stamping on the pavement below, alarms the sleepy inhabitants. From hence the sweep of the shore gives to the water the appearance of a lake, and the peninsula of Constantinople seems joined to that of Pera. Along the horizon are seen the Imperial mosques, crowning the seven hills ; Santa Sophia impending over the gardens and koisks of the seraglio; the mosque of Achmet dis-