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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page 37
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 37. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1897.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 37. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1897

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 37, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1897.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_228.jpg
Transcript WITH THE -rvi \ < in &CHIS OF a 37 When they do depart for distant regions, their vigilance and precaution have been extolled by many writers; their leader appoints certain alight for repose; this they must do standing on one leg, while they hold a stone grasped in the claw of the other. If they are known to ha ;»ed the stone, it is a presumption they have slept on their post, and are punished accordingly; when they arrive at the place of their destination, they take note of the Loiterer who comes last, and he also suffers, a example to the negligent. To the ingenious pictures of ancient writers and otl which tradition has handed down to US, the moderns have added many more.—The Psalmist says, "As for the stork, the fir-trees are her house,"* and here they build at the present day, and seem to take under their protection a multitude of small birds, who make their nests among the materials of the larger ones, and form a numerous community. It is pleasing to see the harmony and affection that subsist between them: and the m of security the smaller evince under the protection of their larger friends. Many of these are birds of passage also, but their size, and the feebleness of their flight, seem to preclude the possibility of a long jouri: they all disappear together, so the Turks affirm that the storks take their little friends upon their backs, and ne carries as many as he can stow between his wings. It is certain, that when the storks disappear in the night, on the next day not a small bird is to be seen left behind them. From a belief in this and similar tales, tin1 Turks conn haracter on the bird; and besides their general indisposition to hurt any animal in of nature, they peculiarly inhibit the destruction of a stork. Whoever injures one, incurs considerable personal danger. For this feeling* there is w Mundation:—the marshes abound with reptiles of all kin rated in immense numbers in the rank slime of the soil. They are providentially the Wunl of i . and, but for their consumption in this way, would so increase as to render the country uninhabitable by man. It appears from Pliny, that their utility for this purpose was so felt, that the penalty of death decreed against any man who destroyed a st.»rk. Though the bird is seen in great numbers in all Oriental tow: its favourite haunt: the inhabitant- feel for it a fraternal regard, call it by endearing names, and affirm their attachment is so mutual, that it follows the Moslem people into whatever part of the globe they emigrate. They erect on their houses frame-work of wood, to induce the stork to build there; the public edifices are covered with them : the mosques and their minarets are full of their nests, and on every "juttil and coign of 'vani ecu their M procreanf cradle." Below, they strut about the town with perfect familiarity, and are never disturbed by those they meet: and their tall, slender heads are seen rising among the turbans and calpacs of a crowded Btreet llous are the Turks of the friendship of this bird, that they affirm it never builds on an edi inhabited by any but a Mussulman. It is certain they are seldom seen in the Greek and Armenian quarters : it is probable the timid Christians, from the apprehension o\ the envy of their masters, discourage or repel the stork whenever it approaches their habitations. cir, 17 2.