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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page 33
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 33. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1892.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 33. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1892

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 33, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1892.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_223.jpg
Transcript WITH Til! 3 OF ASIA MIH 33 APARTMENT IX THE PALACE OF EYOUB, THE RESIDENCE OF THE ASMfi SULTANA. In the delightful region of Eyoub, not far from the tomb of the Ansar, and close upon the waters of the Golden Horn, is an imperial e recalling the memorv of the unfortunate Selim, who selected this quiet and delic .to which he might occasionally retire in pursuit of that tranquillity his gentle spirit was not doomed to enjoy, among the perils and tumults that disturbed his reign. It bears the impress of his hand. Though inclining to and l> j>t Euroj ;es, his taste still Oriental. Unlike the bold and uncompromising character of Mahmoud, he halted between two opinion- ; and, while the new palace of the one exhibits on the shores of the Bosphorus a noble an architecture, the new palace of the other is no improvement on Eastern barbarism; the palace . ;ly Turkish. On passing along the arabesque front, the gaudy glare of the gilded apartments within are reflected through any open casement with an almost painful and dazzling lustre, particularly if the sun shim-. BO I 1 the gazer. The reception-room, or salaam- lik, the only part given in our illustration, i- remote from the harem, from wh seri ous recesses all strangers are utterly excluded : it 1 by a close curtain or screen drawn across the door, and immediately falling behind the ses, and gi a kind of mysterious and jealous precaution even to this | i room. Here a balustrade of pillars runs across, leaving a passage in the centre which is ascended by steps, so that the upper end is raised like the dais of our Gothic halls. This portion of the apartment is covered over with gilding ; the walls are pierced with various and circular r ornamented with pendent members like icicles, and recall the mind to the cloistered sculpture of our old church . notwithstanding the bright glare, convey the impression of gilding on a coffin. The panels are decorated with embossed festoons, glittering with burnished gold on a frosted surfa. • which in a Turk apartment is always highly ornamented, is enclosed in an I 1 moulding with a central embossment, from which the circumference radiating decorations; the ground is azure blue studded with gild* This spacious apartment, like every other room, is entirely divested of furniture. The only seats are cushions of a divan, like a sofa, running round all the walls, on which a man of elevated rank sits ei ed, smoking a chihoipie, whose long tube extends many yards on the floor below, where it ived into a gilded vase, and renovated by a kneeling attendant. Persons of inferior rank recline O0 carpets spread on the floor; beside the balustrade stand the mutes and black slaves, ready to do the befa their master; and, as every person is admitted, he makes a profound salaam, nearly touching his forehead to the ground, on which he lavs his hand, and then raises it to his head as if to 2.