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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page 29
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 29. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 29. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1887

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 29, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_218.jpg
Transcript WITH 1 !IES OF A >1U 29 innumerable sources of salutary v. nich, by some supernatural power coupled to it by its patron, heals dil ind around Constantinople are many wells dedicated to different saints, which retain all the vi: the pool of Bethesda. Beyond the wall- of the city, about halt'-a-inile from the i gate, approaching to the sea of Marmora, is one of the most celebrated of these fountains, which, from the earliest period of its dedication to Christianity, has been held in the highest veneration. The tradition of a miracle wrought by its waters in restoring sight to a blind man, attracted the attention of the Greek emperors, and it afterwards became the obje< their peculiar care. Leo the Great, in the year 460, first erected a church over it. The emperor Justinian was returning one day from hunting, and perceived a great crowd surrounding it. He inquired into the cause, and learned that a miracle of healing had just been wrought by the waters; so, when he had finished his gorgeous temple to " the Eternal Wisdom of God," he appli arplus of his rich materials to adorning I church. It stood for two centuries, an object of wonder and veneration, till it was shattered by an earthquake, when it was finally rebuilt by the empress Irene with more splendour than ever. Such wai 'tity and esteem in which it was held, that imp* marriages were celebrated in it, in pn to Santa Sophia, or other edifices in the city. When Simeon the Bulgarian defeated the Greeks under the walls of the city, he married his son Peter to Maria, the daughter of the emperor Lac u-enus, here; and again, the nuptials of the daughter of C'antaeuzene with the son of Andronicus Palaeol were celebrated in it with great pomp. But, besides the sanetit\ of the place, it- natural beauties present considerable attractions. The Byzantine historian e them in glowing colours: meadows enamelled with flowers of all kinds, gardens filled with the richest fru h the most varied and luxuriant foliage, a balmy air breathing purity and enjoyment, and, above all a fountain which, to use the language of the times, '* the mother of God had endowed with such miraculous gifts, that every bubble that issued from it contained -e." This lovely and health-giving place wai nly of the pious, but of all who sought recreation in rural scenes. The emperors erected a simuner-residt n the church, and the celebrated region was called "the palace and temple of the iovw When the Turks laid siege to the city, their principal attack was at the gate of St. Romanus, near this spot. The rude soldiers, encamped round it. ves, dilapidated its walls, and defiled its fountain: but a traditional an. - told, which conferred, in the eyes of the Buperstitious conquerors, a character as miraculous as that which the Byzantines bestowed upon it. So sure were the infatuated Greeks of Divine assistance to repel their enemies, that they expected the angel Micha moment to descend with a flaming sword and d iem. When the Turks made their last successful attack, and entered the city over the body o( the emperor, a pri frying fish in a part of the edifice still standing: and when it was told him the i was taken, he replied, he could as BOOH believe the fried fish would return to their native element, and again resume life. To convert his incredulity, they did actually from the vessel into the sacred fountain beside it, where they swam about, and continue