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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page 77
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 77. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 77. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1830

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page 77, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page 77
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_161.jpg
Transcript WITH THE SEVEN CHURCHES OF ASIA MINOR. 77 chants are lodged, and their wares stowed, rising sometimes to the height of two or three stories, ascended by stairs, and connected by galleries and corridors. The area has frequently a fountain of pure water playing in the centre, is planted with shrubs and trees, and the fronts are trellaced with vines climbing over the roofs, affording agreeable shade, or pendent with rich clusters of fruit. Some of them are very picturesque and pleasing objects, and afford a most grateful repose to the tired and heated traveller. As the indispensable duties of charity, formerly prescribed to Moslems, and strictly followed, are daily becoming of looser obligation ; the fountains, khans, and other erections of piety and charity, are rapidly falling to decay and ruin, and no new ones are erected to supply their places. The town of Guzel-Hissar, the caravansary of which is given in the illustration, is supposed to be the ancient Tralles, stigmatized by Juvenal for sending its effeminate inhabitants to corrupt the Romans. It is situated in Asia Minor, on the north side of the Meander, about thirty miles from Ephesus. It is approached by an excellent road, with rich gardens on either side, planted with vines, olives, and other Oriental trees. On ascending the hill on which the Acropolis of the ancient city stood, the eye commands a magnificent view of the rich plain beneath, with the Meander twining its tortuous current in such a way, as conveys in a striking manner the character of the stream, and why it gave its name to all winding rivulets. The modern town contains a large population of about fifty thousand inhabitants. The Jews have ten synagogues, and the Greek and Armenian Christians two churches. Our illustration presents the arrival of a caravan, with all its busy accompaniments; the patient camel, " the ship of the desart," and the great medium of communication in these countries, discharging its cargo. Contrasted with this enormous and misshapen beast of burden, is the Arabian courser, on which is mounted the tchelebi, or Turkish gentleman, seated on his lofty saddle, his feet thrust into his fire-shovel stirrups, and his knees protruding above his horse's back by the shortness of his stirrup-leather. On the ground is seated the disengaged traveller, solacing his fatigue with his nargillai, and behind him a pious Mussulman, preparing by ablution for the namaz, or evening prayer. ANADOLI-HISSAR, OR CASTLE OF ASIA, WITH THE HILL OF KANDELI. This castle was originally built, with that on the opposite shore, by the Greek emperors, to command the passage of the strait at its narrowest part. It was falling into ruins by the neglect and supineness of the sovereigns of the lower empire, but the site was appropriated and the edifice rebuilt by Mahomed L, when the Turks extended their dominion to the Asiatic shores of the Bosphorus, as an effectual step in bis advance