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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Page vii
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page vii. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page vii. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1685

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page vii, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page vii
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_016.jpg
Transcript HISTORICAL SKETCH OF CONSTANTINOPLE. VU stood for three centuries unmolested by strangers, the Saracens attempted to take it. They were at that time a great maritime nation, and had made immense naval preparations. They had been converted to Mohammedanism about forty years, and were under an impression that the sins of all those who formed the first expedition against this Christian town would be forgiven; and they set out with a vast fleet. They disembarked on the shore- of the Sea of Marmora, an 1 assaulted the city on the land-side along the whole extent of the wall of The* The height and solidity of it defied them. I mi M\ years they persevered in their attacks, till sickness, famine, and the sword nearly annihilated their vast army. Their attempts were renewed at several times afterwards, and defeated by the teiTOV of the Greek fire, which was then for the first time discovered and made use of. The attack- of the Saracens having failed, and the Asiatics having desisted from a hopeless attempt. B new enemy advanced against the devoted city, and from a very different quarter. In the J - in the reign of Michael, son of Theophilus, the Sarmatians, Scythians, and the barbarous people now composing the empire of Russia, collected I \aM tlect of boat-, formed out of the hollowed trunks of single trees, and from hence called by the Greeks monoxylotu They descended the great rivers, and, from the mouth of the Borysthenes, fearlessly pushed out into the open Bea in those immense navigable which are ^ti 11 seen in the same regions. Their vast swarms of boats, like squadrons of Indian canoes, arrived at the mouth of the Bosphorus, and darkened the waters of the Strait with their countless numbers. But the rude navy of those undisciplined barbarians vras either sunk by the Greek fleet, or consumed by the Greek fire. For a century they continued, with unsubdued perseverance, in their tierce attacks, fresh swarms always BUCCeeding to those that were destroyed, till at length one great and final attempt was made to obtain the object of their cupidity. In the year D78j ■ v>lst land-army was added to the fleet, and the command given to Suati-la-. B Bavage of singular habits and ferocity. He slept in the winter in the open air, having a heap of straw for his bed, wrapped in a bear's skin, and with no pillow but tddle. He quaffed an acid drink, probably the quass of the modern Russians, and he dined en slices of horse-llesh, which he broiled himself on the embers with the point of his sword, lie was 'united by the emperor Nicephoras to repel an invasion of other barbarian-, and be gladly undertook the enterprise. Having proceeded round the coast of the Euxine in his hollow | i the mouth of the Danube, he disembarked: and, defeating the barbarians against whom he was allied, he advanced to the Balkan mountains. Here he looked down from the heights on the fertile plains below, and at once conceived the project of making himself master of the city, and obtaining that object of ambition, which the Russians never BUI I to have abandoned. To this end, he descended, and Hist proceeded to Adrianople. The Greeks, finding he had l this great barrier, became dreadfully alarmed. They sent a formal demand that their ally should now evacuate their territory, as they had no longer an occasion for his Bervicea He replied, he could not think of returning till he had seen the wonders of their great city. Swatislas, never calculating on a. retreat, had neglected to secure the