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Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
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Allom, Thomas. Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page v. 1838. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas. (1838). Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page v. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1683

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Allom, Thomas, Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor - Page v, 1838, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1996/show/1683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Constantinople and the scenery of the seven churches of Asia Minor
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Allom, Thomas
Contributor (Local)
  • Walsh, Robert
Publisher Fisher, Son, & Co.
Date 1838
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Istanbul, Turkey
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 92 plates
Original Item Location DR 427 .A44
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1817693~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_011
Item Description
Title Page v
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_011_014.jpg
Transcript Hut though architects might be thus created for the ordinary civil purposes, it eniusof sculpture, or form anew a Phidias or a Praxiteles Orders therefore were 'licet whatever specimens could be found antiquity ; and, like Napoleon in modern times, he stri; all other cities of their ti asun B, to adorn his own capital. Historians record the details of ps works of art of this great and gorgeous city, as it rose under the plastic- hand of its founder, scarcely a trace of which is to be seen at the present day, and the in will 1 more minutely hereafter. Suffice it to say, that the I ot Zeuxippi with various sculptured marble, and sixty h: of the finest workmanship. The Hippodrome, or rse, four hundred filled with pillars and obelisks; a public college, a circus, two ; public and one hundred and fifty private baths, five granaries, eight aqueducl r water, four halls for the meeting of the senate and con; justice, fourttt n temples, fourteen palaces, and four thousand three hundred and ei. eight doi, , in which resided the nobility of the city, seemed to ic under the hand of the active and energetic emperor. But the erection that gives this city perhaps its greatest interest, and it is one of the < aped the hand of time or accident, is that which commemorates his con- >n to Christianity. lie not only placed the Christian standard on the coins of his City, hut proclaimed that the new city itself was dedicated to Christ. An his columns was one of red porphyry, resting on a base of marble; between both he deposited one of the nail- which had fastened our Saviour to the cross, and a part of one of the miraculous loaves with which he had fed the five thousand; and he inscribed on the base an epigram in Creek, importing that he had dedicated the city to Christ, and M placed it under his protection, as the lluler and Governor of the world." Whenever he passed the pillar, he de-cended from his horse, and caused his attendants to do the -anic: and in such reverence did ho hold it, that he ordered it, and the place in which it Stood, to be sailed M The Sacred." The pillar still stands. Constantine left three sons, who Mrd him: and numerous relatives, who all, with one exception, adopted the religious opinions he bad embraced. This was Julian, his nephew, lie had been early instructed in the doctrines and duties of the new faith, had taken orders, and read the Scrip- publicly to the people: but meeting with the sceptic philosophers of Asia, his aith was shaken, and, when the empire descended to him, he openly abandoned it. With BOme estimable qualities, was joined a superstitious weakness, which would not sutler him to rc-t in the philosophic rejection of Christianity. He revived, in its place, all the revolting absurdities of heathenism. In the language of the historian Socrates, •* He itly afraid of daanons. and was continually sacrificing to their idols." He therefore not only erased the Christian from his coins, but he replaced them with Scrapie, Anubis, and other deities of Egyptian superstition. He was killed on the banks of the Euphrates* in an expedition against the Persians, having, happily for mankind, reigned but one year and eight months, and established for himself the never- to-be-forgotten name of "Julian the Apostate."