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The story of Nuremberg
Page 292
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 292. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 292. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 292, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 292
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_291.jpg
Transcript The Story of Nuremberg Secretum civium dc Nurembercli. Thi> Wat ilwS .ipri\y seal for letters of Importance. Before this seal came i' the city seal was used fof all purpose*, and even append greater security) to private documents such M entailing deeds, testaments and jointures. At a later date this MaJ was ehietly appended to testaments. The seals, both of the Mayor and of the Council, though not arms, were used as such ; however, their real character VI understood, Even in 1477 the Council decreed that the window which the city proposed to place in the choir of St. Lawi Church should be adorned * with the arms of the Council and the privy and common arms of the city." Here a distinction i- expressly made between the seal and the arms However, the proper arms of the town were — Bendy (iulis and Argent impaling Of an Imperial eagle dimidiated, table. The dexter Bide 01 the shield If often incorrectly re presented as Gules, three bendletf argent. It is also wrong to describe it fas many writers have done . M Barry of six. gules and argent. Meisterlin applies t<> the dexter tide tlu term Field oi Swabia, which we only Mention here becaUM \' II -till occasionally employed. Hi < aunc name to the district in which Nuremberg lies apparently hy confusion with the ••Can" of Sualalehl . Nuremberg has accordingly nothing to do with Swabia, as was probably Inferred oantnrii The origin oi the arms Is obscure. It is howetei worth mentioning that the Bnrggravei <>1 Nuremberg bore this « Field ol Swabia" as a bordure on their arms These arm-, u m have been Used since the leCOnd half ot the fourteenth century as the counter—eal of the city seal above mentioned, as also on stamped parchment and stamped paper (only Introduced towards the end of the seventeenth CI iitury . on coins struck at Nuremberg, on public buildings. etC The human head on the eagle of the priv\ -eal. aitei . called the •• Eagle-Maiden." is explained by Mummen the face of an emperor with long Mowing locks and the Imperial crown on his bead. It retains this character throughout the Middle Ages both on the seal, ami also when the seal was used a> a coat-of-arms. MnnuntnhonT instances in particular the tinr eagle on the town side of the upper story of the 1 hiergartner-Catt Tower. With Albert Durer, hoffl begins the quite onhistorical tranafiguration ol this The emperoi no longer understood and was mi for a female face; and thus in course of time a series of unjustifiable embellishments produced a coat-of-arms hearing 292