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The story of Nuremberg
Page 162
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 162. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1533.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 162. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1533

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 162, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1533.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 162
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_169.jpg
Transcript Story of Nuremberg berg questions. Readers of Sir Walter Scott will remember his description of the " boot "—an iron frame in which the leg was inserted and broken by iron wedges driven in with a hammer. The pcnni- winkis, thumb-screws, and caschielawis, iron frar the leg heated from time to time over a brazier, were also favourite instruments both there and here. It is not surprising that such persuasion usually succeeded in producing a confession from the pri whether true or not, of their own or of other people's guilt. Thev were not infrequently compelled to con- o crimes which they had never committed and were hanged for murdering : weie found to be alive and well. Real criminals, however, often refused to .speak ; for habitual and | sional malefactors used to torture each other regularlv in order to be hardened when brought to justice. But in that case their wives and children often pro\ reticent. Confession having been secured the Council appointed a day of judgment for the urmen, " poor fellow," as they termed him. If when he came before them he still persisted in his confession he was condemned. But condemnation depended on the confession of the criminal, and the Church had long maintained that confessions obtained under torture were invalid. If, therefore, when brought before the Council he recanted he was tortured again, and as often retracted this process was repeated until a con: apart from torture was obtained. The humane intervention of the Church thus resulted in a redoublc- ment of cruelty. l\\en after condemnation, if the convict told the clergyman, who came to prepare him for death, that he was really not guilty but had confessed only because of the torture, the Council on hearing of it had to begin all over again. This became such a nuisance that they warned the clcigv not to talk to the 162