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The story of Nuremberg
Page 152
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 152. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 152. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1523

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 152, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 152
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_159.jpg
Transcript The Story of Nuret/r of them obtained in the service of the Emperor, or elsewhere, the dignity of knighthood. As early as the fifteenth century the 1 lies claimed the rights of knighthood and heraldry like territorial nobles. Probably the tourney held in 1446, on the occasion of a Patrician wedding, and represented in life-size stucco-work on the ceiling of the upper corridor in the Town Hall, b intended as a manifesto to this effect. At any rate it is recorded that this tourney vexed the nobles very sorely, "as they opined, it did not become the Nuremberg families to tilt in noble conflict or to indulge in such knightly pastime ; it was indeed generally held that this tourney had had no little influence in bringing about the great Margravian War which soon followed." In the n in 1485, in the Heidelberg and Heilbronn tournament regulations, the Town Patriciate's right of tourney was ally contested. Though we do not know how their prerogative arose, we certainly find that by 1521 the number of actual Patrician families was limited to fortv-three, whi the end of the century, only twentY-eight are left eligible for the Council. The] fanned a close and very exclusive corporation, clinging very tightlv to their fabricated privileges. "Anno icai," rn old statute, "it was declared and set down I Elders of the Town of Nuremberg which familie always from time immemorial ,: 1 dance in the Town Hall." We cannot deny that the short-sighted policy so often pursued by Nuremberg to her own uncfoil due to the narrow and selfish oligarchy thus fo But if we blame them for the decay we mi, them full meed of praise for the ripening of the prosperity of Nuremberg. The truth seems to be that the i52