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The story of Nuremberg
Page 151
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 151. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 151. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 151, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 151
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_158.jpg
Transcript The C uncil House clusiveness. The final result was the separation of the citizens into the governing families and into the remaining classes cut off from any influence upon the town go. | and represented in general by the ies Guilds. This antithesis, which existed in all towns, led everywhere, in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, to violent conflicts; in our town, to the riots of 134N to which we have already referred. eligible to the Council composed the , the origin of which can no longer be traced in detail. The Patricians were not, as often in other towns, burghers of long standing, for in the fourteenth century and later, even up to the beginning of the sixteenth cen- nappencd that foreign families settling here were at once accepted as eligible to the Council. This is a circumstance which does not at all correspond to the usual conception of the burgher exclusiveness in the Middle Ages; but on the contrary it betrays a certain liber. The Patricians appear with others of the nobility as witnesses to documents, and are not infrequently given precedence over the territorial nobility. They carried shield, helmet, and seal ; their hatchments hung in the churches, U fiefs from the princes, and were eligible to church dignitu >. The Patriciate, howc did not by any means occupy itself wholly with military service and knightly exercises. Many of them carried on wholesale businesses and manufacturing trades. This occurred pre* illy throughout the Middle Ages, as also in the sixteenth century, though their descendants denied I were ever connected with trade. he burghers were in general capable of bearing arms, the governing ta mi I ies especially kept themse in military p: led the armed burghers or the wars of their country, and sj