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The story of Nuremberg
Page 130
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 130. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 130. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1502

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 130, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 130
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_138.jpg
Transcript The Story of berg able mud, and even though in the lower part ot the town trenches were dug to drain the streets, they remained mere swamps and morasses. In dry weather the dust was even a worse plague than the mud. I stood in front of the houses; and the streets were covered with heaps of fdth and manure and with rotting corpses of animals, over which the pigs wandered at will. Street police in fact was practically non-existent. Medievalism is undoubtedly better when survr As to the original extent of the city walls there are many theories. Most likely they embraced a very small district. According to Mummenhoff the first town wall ran from the west side of the Castle in a southerly direction over the modern Weinmarkt. (To reach it go straight down the Albert Du: starting from Durer's house.) Further on tl. struck eastwards (/) to the river, either leaving the swampy meadowland near the river free, or, as others hold, coming right down to the river banks. Then, leaving the river aoain near the SpitalplatZ, it stretched northward, apparently from the Malerthor which was then in existence, to the Romer Tower in the Tetzel- gasse.1 This tower was probably not actually part of the wall but a fortified house, such as may be seen in many German and Italian towns, built bv the dwellers in it for their own especial protection. A noble familv of the name of Romer lived there in early tin* gave their name to the house. But popular tradition has forgotten this fact and asserts that the tower dates back from Roman times. 1 We shall do well enough if we work down Winkle:- and then strik.- across (/ the Haupt Markt. pass through Hans Sachs Gasse, across tin Spiral Plat/., up tlu- ' ing Tucher Strasse and the top of Therstlen 1 which, short turns first to the left and then to the right bring us into I .4 sel G ■ so