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The story of Nuremberg
Page 124
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 124. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 124. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1496

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 124, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1496.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 124
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_132.jpg
Transcript y Nuremberg Meanwhile, leaving the Deep Well and passing some insignificant modern dwellings (r), ami leaving beneath us on the left the I limmelsthor, let us approach the summit of the rock and the buildings of the Kaiserburg itself. As we advance to the gateway with the intention of ringing the hell tor the castellan, we notice on the left the Double Chapel, attached to the Heidenthurm (Heathen Tower, see page }), the lower part of which is encrusted with what were once supposed to be Pagan images. The Tower protrudes beyond the face of the third plateau, and its prominence may indicate the width of a trench, now idled in, which was once dug outside the enclosing wall <>; the summit of the rock. The whole of the south side of this plateau il taken up by the Palas (the vast hall. two stories high, which, though it has been repeatedly rebuilt, may in its original structure be traced back as far as the twelfth century), and the Kemnate or dwelling-rooms which seem to have been withot. means of defence. This plateau, like the second, is supplied with a well. But the first object th.it strikes the eye on entering the court-yard is the ruined lime- tree, the branches of which 0 id their broad and verdant shelter over the whole extent of the quadrangle. The Empress Kunigunde planted it, says the lefl some seven hundred years ago. For once, when Kin*; Henry was a-hunting, he came in the pursuit of to the edge of a strep precipice, and this in the ! the chase he did not perceive, but would have fallen headlong had not a lime-branch, at which he g; in his extremity, stopped and saved him. And he. recognising the special protection o\' the'Mosl Eiigh, broke oil' a twig of the lime-tree- in remembrai his wonderful preservation, and brought it to his anxious wife, who planted it at once with hei 124