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The story of Nuremberg
Page 103
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 103. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1476.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 103. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1476

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 103, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1476.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 103
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_112.jpg
Transcript The Thirty Tears' War were recognised. But she became a quiet and obedient attendant of the Reichstag in Regensburg, paying her quota of men and money, and supporting the Hapsburg interests. Her energy, in fact, had been exhausted. The census of her citizens in 1622 amounted to 40,000; in 1806 to 25,000 With the decrease in her population, her prosperity decreased. The load of debt accumulated during the Thirty Years War weighed her down. Her trade, like that of Augsburg and all the other German towns, went from bad to worse. Dislocated during the war, it could not recover now. Chief among the causes of decay must be counted the circumnavigation of the Cape of Good Hope. Prior to that, all merchandise from the East was obliged to travel overland into Europe and came for distribution by wav ot Gen riberg then naturally became the chief entrepot. Now she suffered, with Venice, from the discovery of this new channel of commerce. d boasted that thanks to them Nuremberg had come from nothing to be the richest town in G The I ondamenta dei Tedeschi, the German quarter in Venice since the days of the Crusades, still bears witness to their connection with the German traders, and, in Nuremberg, winged lions on many of the houses still record same fact. Other and mo .hie causes contributed to the decrease of Nuremberg trade. She adopted aggeratcd system ion, and levied exorbi* taxes on goods brought into or through the country. In the old days every good thing had been said to come out of Nuremberg (Was gut sein sollte, wurde aus Nurnberg verschrieben) ; now the output of her manufactures was foolishly limited by rules. In some trades, for instance, only the son or the husband of a 103