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The story of Nuremberg
Page 87
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 87. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1460.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 87. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1460

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 87, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1460.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 87
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_096.jpg
Transcript Nuremberg and the Reformation 1 lo her dealings with the princes. But the Markgraf, ignoring this subterfuge, moved on the city, and the Council, seeing that he was set on war, determined to stand a siege, and strained every to strengthen the fortifications. The princes, indeed, remonstrated with the Markgraf; but in He advanced, ravaging the villages, taking castles, burning and plundering all he could lay his hands on in his drunken and murderous march. W he arrived beneath I mberg, a truce of eight days was arranged till the Markgraf could ncis I. of France. Meanwhile he busied himself with throwing up entrenchments. But before the eight days had expired, he opened fire on the city. Some cannon-shots struck the iEgidienskirche, in which a service was being held. One house in the iEgidiensplatz still bears the marks of shot that struck it on this occasion, says Dr Reicke. Meanwhile Nuremtk ot slow to defend herself. iti/ens returned th :ii energy, and made some successful sallies. Gold they seem to have used as well as steel; for the Markgraf, after one or two nients, declared that he would hold no more parleyings with the Nurembergers, for that they had tried to corrupt one of his commanders. The posuion of Nuremberg was now very serious. No help was to be expected from any quart* therefore, the towns of Franconia and Swabia came forward at last to act as tnten them with every feeling of relief, and was easily per- 1 to join, nominally, .it any rate, the league against the Emperor. Tin Markg I belli was now gone ; but his demands knew no bounds. He insisted on a huge indemnity and the right to garrison the town. In face of this, continued nee was the onlv course for Nuremberg.