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The story of Nuremberg
Page 73
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 73. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1447.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 73. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1447

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 73, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1447.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 73
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_083.jpg
Transcript ■■■■■MHMMMMI Nuremberg and the borders of the famous Book oj Hours. Finally when M ximilian held the diet at Augsburg in 1518, D who was one of the commissioners sent by the town of Nuremberg, drew the Emperor's portrait from the life, "in the little room upstairs in the palace." From this sketch he painted the picture now at Vienna, another version of which is in the G< M aseum at Nuremberg. Durer was as good a courtier as ar Melanchthon tells us how Maximilian was endeavouring to draw a design which he wished Durer to carry out, but kept breaking the charcoal in doing so. Durer took the charcoal and easily finished the without breaking the charcoal. Maximilian, somewhat vexed, asked how this was, to which the artist replied, " I should not like yoi. v to be able to draw as well as L It is my province to draw and yours to rule." Aliud est plectrum, aliudsceptrum. The hand that wields the sceptre is too strong for the brush. Maximilian was, in many aspects of his charac typical product ot lissance. Nuremberg had felt the full force of the revival of .the new stimulus in art and literature which was being brought to the West fron. tinople by tl and Greeks who had been dri\ 'he Turks. v a few of the knights and pilgrims, too, must h passed through Nuremberg on their return from Crusades, and her gro : ast and \ Italy would tend to keep her in touch with the developments which were taking place in the world of ideas, and which wi towards the Reformation. She had been among I first to welcome and I . the DC un art" of printing. Between 1470, when Johann oensenschmidt had brought Gufl invention to Nuremberg, and the end of tin print- . .loham