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The story of Nuremberg
Page 20
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 20. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 20. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1397

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 20, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_033.jpg
Transcript The Story of Nuremberg (Ratisbon) into the league that we first find men. tion of the Rat or Council of burghers joined to the chief magistrate as an institution representative of the community. Since the Charter of I almost the whole administration of justice—g<> ment, police and finance—had been centred no longer in the Burggraf, but in the chief (Schuldheiss) of the town. But, by the same charter, Nuremberg was now to be taxed afl a community. From the natural necessity and apprehensions of the situation, the burghers felt the need of a representative body to sit with and to advise the n who was, originally at any rate, a King's man and officer of the Burggraf. So it cam the bench of judges who assisted the Schuldhei his judicial work, a bench composed of the powerful and influential citizens, gradual 13 the further function of an advising and body, and finally became independent of the ra trate. Little by little, by one charter after anoi by gradual and persistent effort, the K it gained thfl position of landlords and Terrkoriiberren* B the Council gained power, the great families began to arrogate to themselves the sole right of Bitting on it. A close aristocracy of wealth grew up rnOIt and more jealous of their fancied rights. Such was the origin of the constitution of Nuremberg—a constitution which in later times offers a strikin semblance to that of Venice. At last the Interregnum came to an end. I mainly through Burggraf Frederick III. of N that Rudolph von Hapsburg succeeded to the Empire! For this and other service the Burggrav mule hereditary in his family. Under Rudolph the strong and just, who, after the demoralising period of\marchv, worked wonders in the way of tightening, wl 20