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The story of Nuremberg
Page 14
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 14. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 14. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 14, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_027.jpg
Transcript The Story oj Nuremi connected with another of the great ruling famiL the world. " It was in those same years," say. Cailyl.-.' " that I young fellow, Conrad by name far off in the Southern part of Germany set out from the old Castle of Hobenxollem tin- southern summit of that same huge old Hercynian wood, which is still called the Schwar/.wald or BUcl I thoilffh now comparatively bare of trees) when- he was but a junior and had small outlooks, upon a \ : rand in the world. . . . His purpose was to find BurbarOttt and leek iM'iiM him. To this Frederick Redbeard a magnificent, magnanimous man, holding the reins of tin- wi aite in the imaginary sense; scour^in^ anarchy down and ur^in^ noble effort up, really on a grand leak -Conrad addressed bin and he did it with success; which may be taken as .1 kind oj testimonial to the worth of the youn^ man. Detail* ire baft absolutely none; but their is no doubt that Conrad n mended himself to Kaiter Redbeard. nor any that the I was a judge of men. . . . One thing further ia known, cant for his successes: Conrad found favour with • of the Vohbur^ Family,'desirable TOUOg beiretl,and ^<>t her to wife. The Vohburo family, now much forgotten everywhere, and never heard of in England before, bad long been of supreme importance, of immense possessions, and opulent in territories. and, we need not add, in honours and offices, in those Franconian Niirnberg regions; and was now gOOC to this one girl. I know not that she hatl mucli inheritanee all: the vast Vohburg properties lapsing all to the K when the male heirs were out. But sbe had pretension*, tacit claims: in particular tin- Vohburgl bad Ion;.: habitual or in effect hereditary Bur^grafs of N&rnbefg ; ami if Conrad had the talent for that office, be now in pre! to others might have a chance for it. Sun.- enoogh, it; took root in it, he and bis; and. in tin- COUrte ol eenturie-. l)ranched up from it. high and wide, over the adjoining countries; waxing towards still higher deatio i- the epitome of Conrad's history; history now I but then no bigger than its neighbours and rery nv recorded; of which the reflective reader is to make wbat he- can. . . . "As to the Office, it was more important than | reader imagines. In a Diet of the Empire 1170; we find 1 •• Hist. Frederick the Great," vol. i.. bk. ii . cb. \. 14