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The story of Nuremberg
Page 8
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Headlam, Cecil. The story of Nuremberg - Page 8. 1899. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1386.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil. (1899). The story of Nuremberg - Page 8. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1386

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Headlam, Cecil, The story of Nuremberg - Page 8, 1899, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/1669/show/1386.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The story of Nuremberg
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Headlam, Cecil
Contributor (Local)
  • James, H. M.
Publisher J. M. Dent & Co.
Date 1899
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • History
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Nuremberg, Germany
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 303 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DD901.N93 H4 1899
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1684865~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_001
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_001_022.jpg
Transcript The Story of Nuremberg Nuremberg on the South and North, the East and Western trade routes, brought to her. It was not very long before she became the centre of the trade between the Levant and Westei , and the chief emporium for the produce of Italy—the Handelsmetropole in fact of South Germany. Nothing in the middle ages was more conduci the prosperity of a town than the reputation of haTUM a holy man within its borders, or the possession of the miracle-working relics of a saint, .lust made Marburg so St. Sebaldus proved a very potent attraction to Nuremberg. We shall gi\e KMDC a.count of this saint when we visit the church that was dedicated to him. Here we need only remark ti. as 1070 and 1080 we hear of pilgrimages to Nuremberg in honour of her patron saint. Another factor in the growth of the plao frequent visits which the Emperors began to pay to it. Lying as it did on their way from Bamberg and Forcheim to Regensburg the Kaisers readily availed themselves of the security offered by this impregnable ft) of the sport provided in the adjacent forest for there was good hunting to be had in the forest which, se\ two miles in extent, surrounded Nuremberg, hunting, next to war, was then in most parts of Europe the most serious occupation of life. All the rights, we may mention, of woodcutting, hunting, charcoal burning and bee-farming belonged originally to the Empire. But these were gradual 1\ acquired bv the Nuremberg Council (Rat), chiefly by pordu the fifteenth century. In the castle the visitor may notice a list of all the Emperors—some thirty odd, all told—who h. there—a list that should now include the reigning Emperor. We find that Henry IV. frequ honoured Nuremberg with his presence, Thil 1 8