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Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir”
Transcript, page 2
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Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845. Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir” - Transcript, page 2. August 7, 1836. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/earlytex/item/83/show/81.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845. (August 7, 1836). Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir” - Transcript, page 2. Early Texas Documents. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/earlytex/item/83/show/81

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845, Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir” - Transcript, page 2, August 7, 1836, Early Texas Documents, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/earlytex/item/83/show/81.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir”
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845
Date August 7, 1836
Description Letter from Andrew Jackson to an unidentified “sir” stating that sending 10,000 volunteers to Texas would violate the neutrality and respect to the contest of Texas.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Texas--History--Revolution, 1835-1836
  • Texas--History--To 1846
  • Texas--History--Republic, 1836-1846
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Hermitage, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • letters (correspondence)
  • correspondence
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1973-001, Box 1, Folder 141
Original Collection Early Texas Documents Collection
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Transcript Hermitage August 7th 1836 Sir, I reached home on the evening of the Lith and was soon surrounded with the papers and letters which had been sent here in anticipation of my arrival. Amongst other important natters which immediately engaged my attention was the requisition of Genl Gaines on Tennesse, Kentucky, Mississippi and Louisiana. Believing that the reasons given for this requisition were not consistent with the neutrality which it is our duty to observe in respect to the contest in Texas, and that it would embarrass the appointment which had been made of the 10,000 volunteers authorised by the recent (page 2) act of Congress, I informed Governor Cannon by letter on the 5th instant, that it could not receive my sanction. The volunteers authorised by Congress were thought competent with the aid of the regular force to terminate the Indian War in the South, and protect our western frontier: and they were the ttfSt calculated apportioned in a manner/to secure these objects. Agreeably
Item Description
Title Transcript, page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name eatex_201210_0145_010.jpg
Transcript ANDREW JACKSON—PAGE 2 called on. I had written thus far when (page h) your letter of the 20th of July last accompanied by- one from Genl. Wool of the 15>th of July and one from Genl# Towsen of the 2£th of July last was handed to me* The letter fron Genl, Wool was unexpected. His guide was the requisition on the State: and I cannot well imagine how he could suppose that the Department would authorise a greater number of troops to be mustered and paid than he was/espec^ailyjjirgcted to receive, Ke was apprised fully of the apportionment which had been made of the 10,000 volunteers, and of the consideration which reduced us to require 1000 from Florida, 2000 from Georgia, 2000 from Alabs. and 25>00 from Tennessee. This force was designated in this manner because it was in the county M nearest to the Seminolcs, Creeks and Cherokees, and (page 5) in like manner was the force designated for the western frontier except a fraction of about U30 men to be hereafter selected when it should be ascertained where it would be most needed. It is therefore unaccountable to me why Genl Wool would receive and muster into the service a great number than has been called for, and placed under his command, particularly as he knew that Tennessee had already been called upon for more volunteers than the proportion in the general apportionment. He knows that the President can only execute the law and he ought to have recollected that if the officer charged with the military operations contemplated by the law were (page 6) to use their own discretion in fixing the number of me to be received and mustered into the service, there could be no certainty in the amount of force which would be brought into the field. His guide was the requisition upon Tennessee for 2^00 and he should never have departed from it. We have men whose patriotism brought them into the field ought to be paid :but I seriously doubt whether any of the money now appropriated can be used for this purpose as all the volunteers authorized by the act of Congress have been apportioned, and the appropriations should be first applicable to their payment if they should be ordered into the field. All that we can do is to bring the subject before the next