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Steeplejacks
Page 11
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M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... Steeplejacks - Page 11. 1920. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 4, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... (1920). Steeplejacks - Page 11. Architectural Retail Catalog Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/685

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd.., Steeplejacks - Page 11, 1920, Architectural Retail Catalog Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 4, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Steeplejacks
Creator (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Publisher Nottingham: M. Macdonald & Co .
Date 1920
Description A 51-page booklet published in 1920 called “Steeljacks” by M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd. based out of several Great Britain offices including London, England. Content includes numerous illustrated pages on steeplejacks, chimneys, spires, lightning conductors, and the repair and restoration of towers.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Steeple-jacks
  • Spires
  • Towers
  • Chimneys
  • Lightning conductors
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • chimneys
  • towers
  • building designs
  • architecture
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
  • catalogs (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location T54 .M2 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b5576987~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Catalog Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name aapam_201209_005ak.jpg
Transcript valuable dictum to follow because so many people who are penny wise and pound foolish often regret they acted without due regard to quality. AN EXPERT'S VIEW. From the expert's view, chimney shafts such as are required for Power Stations, Gas Works, Coke Ovens, Blast Furnaces, etc., should be closely examined every three years, and factory chimneys irrespective of height should have a laddered inspection every five years. This is quite apart from casual ground observations. You will be surprised how maintenance costs can be kept at a minimum by these periodical inspections. With chimneys iy years old and more it is usually found on examination that the surface mortar has disintegrated, thus allowing rain water to percolate to the core of the brickwork. This would soon cause a permanent weakness in the structure if it were not attended to, and is merely an instance where at small cost the defect can be remedied, but if unattended would eventually involve the owner in a very heavy expenditure. Normally repointing is a simple operation, but it must be done correctly. It is no use merely filling in the fissures and open joints which have occurred. The first essential is to rake out all perished mortar and thoroughly clean all the joints, for without this initial process a sound job cannot be executed. Every owner of a tall structure knows how suddenly cracks can develop, either longitudinally or horizon; tally. To a layman, the causes are hidden, but to the professional steeplejack, a laddered inspection usually enables him to pimpoint the trouble. Sometimes a "list" occurs of alarming proportions, and in the majority of cases, it could have been obviated by periodical inspections. We cannot stress too highly the value and importance of regular inspections. Their cost is saved over and over again in the retention of the solidarity of the struc; ture. Decay is then checked, and major repairs more often than not prevented. CHIMNEY BUILDING. Daily repetitive work is essential in the erection of a brick chimney, the height being decided by the amount of steam required. The prerequisite to a sound and effective structure is adequate foundations, and there must be a regulated daily rise, of the chimney in the building process. Speed must not enter into the contract, for there is always a danger of applying too much weight to the already "green" work below, which ultimately would create an inherent weak; ness due to the formation of settlement fissures and lead later to untold expense in maintenance. Then there is the question of the use of right materials. Experience has taught us that the ideal is a good quality engineering brick and lime mortar. Cement, which sets too rigidly, should never be used, as it would not allow of the required elasticity to enable the finished structure to respond to the laws of expansion and contraction. And this brings us to another question which is frequently asked. Does a chimney sway, and if so, how much ? The answer is that a chimney does move, the extent being governed by its height, design and location, and the prevailing wind