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Steeplejacks
Page 10
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M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... Steeplejacks - Page 10. 1920. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 4, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... (1920). Steeplejacks - Page 10. Architectural Retail Catalog Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/684

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd.., Steeplejacks - Page 10, 1920, Architectural Retail Catalog Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 4, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Steeplejacks
Creator (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Publisher Nottingham: M. Macdonald & Co .
Date 1920
Description A 51-page booklet published in 1920 called “Steeljacks” by M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd. based out of several Great Britain offices including London, England. Content includes numerous illustrated pages on steeplejacks, chimneys, spires, lightning conductors, and the repair and restoration of towers.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Steeple-jacks
  • Spires
  • Towers
  • Chimneys
  • Lightning conductors
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • chimneys
  • towers
  • building designs
  • architecture
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
  • catalogs (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location T54 .M2 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b5576987~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Catalog Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name aapam_201209_005aj.jpg
Transcript quarters, and for your own safety we would advise clients to insist on every occasion on the production of insurance policies so as to avoid possible costly litigation at a sub; sequent time. There need not be any such doubts with the Macdonald Organization. When we come to consider the third basic cause of accidents—over;confidence—that is a matter over which neither employer nor client has much control. This is sheer carelessness, because every steeplejack is taught, or should be, to take no personal risk, to observe and think clearly, and only perform one operation at a time. Such early advice is of the utmost importance, and we in our organization do everything in our power to impress the entrant into the profession of its essential nature. It is a second kind of safety belt which should never be disregarded. It is quite as bad as using inferior or doubtful plant, or for the mere handy;man to take on the job of a professional steeple; jack. That is asking for trouble, and much to our dismay there are those to;day who are prepared to take abnormal risks, men who are not thoroughly skilled in the pro; fession and rely on gear which so often exceed most sanguine expectations. An experienced steeplejack will judge every problem of his work with objective sagacity. The line dividing genuine originality from a shallow affectation is sometimes a very thin one. The very complexity of steeplejack work tempts some tradesmen to take short cuts to conviction. These short cuts assume many dangerous forms and invariably result in a mediocre job being attained. There can only be one path for any owner or custodian of chimneys to tread, and that is the one to safety. Periodical inspection and maintenance of all high structures are essential for they are far more exposed to the elements than ordinary structures. They have to bear greater stresses and strain, and it is certainly far more economical to have these inspections at given intervals. In this way, the expert can save enormous expense, for in so many instances the old adage of "A stitch in time" or to be more precise "The employment of a trowel in repointing" is all too true. To many owners in the past, costs have been the predominant factor, but how often has it been proved that the cheapest is the most costly in the long run, and vice; versa. We say without hesitation, over a long experience, that a first;class job is always the best and the cheapest because faults are correctly diagnosed and many unseen dangers removed. And it is a lasting job. First;class workmanship should always be the main consideration, for so much is dependent on this particular class of work. Steeplejacks working for a reputable firm have a tradition to maintain and in the quality of their work they apply the hallmark of a firm's reputation. Remember what Ruskin said in this connection : "All works of taste must bear a price according to the skill, taste, time, expense, risk attending their manufacture. Those things called dear are, when justly estimated, the cheapest." This treatise is explanatory rather than an effort to laudate any particular steeple; jack, but we would advise owners and custodians of high and important building structures of the enormous responsibility they bear. That the best is the best is a