Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Steeplejacks
Page 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... Steeplejacks - Page 7. 1920. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/681.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd... (1920). Steeplejacks - Page 7. Architectural Retail Catalog Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/681

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd.., Steeplejacks - Page 7, 1920, Architectural Retail Catalog Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/726/show/681.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Steeplejacks
Creator (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Publisher Nottingham: M. Macdonald & Co .
Date 1920
Description A 51-page booklet published in 1920 called “Steeljacks” by M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd. based out of several Great Britain offices including London, England. Content includes numerous illustrated pages on steeplejacks, chimneys, spires, lightning conductors, and the repair and restoration of towers.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Steeple-jacks
  • Spires
  • Towers
  • Chimneys
  • Lightning conductors
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • chimneys
  • towers
  • building designs
  • architecture
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • M. Macdonald & Co. (Steeplejacks) Ltd..
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
  • catalogs (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location T54 .M2 1920
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b5576987~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Catalog Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name aapam_201209_005ag.jpg
Transcript STEEPLEJACKS CJTEEPLEJACKS ! How often ordinary laymen watch from the streets the activities of men moving about, more resembling flies than anything else, on steeples or chimneys hundreds of feet in the air, or some building of dizzy heights. They stand and wonder, and in their wonderment, there is curiosity as well as admiration. They begin to ask themselves all kinds of questions, and finish with the conclusion that after all this task might well have been included as another wonder of the world. How can they remain steady and work at the same time at such heights—how do they steel their nerve—how do they establish poise ? To answer these and other questions is the purpose of this brochure. But let us first consider how the services of steeplejacks became so necessary that to*day they are quite commomplace. It was the industrial revolution that brought this highly specialized profession into the forefront ; factories and workshops began to spring up everywhere, and this brought into its train the problems of steam and a smoke4aden atmosphere. The obvious answer to smoke abatement—we had not then reached the present great heights in scientific research—was more lofty chimneys, and the face of Britain began to take on a new appearance although less attractive. First of all these chimneys of greater and greater heights had to be built, and as time went on they had to be repaired. He was no ordinary bricklayer or mason who was employed on this specialized task, and the calling of the steeplejack became increasingly important. Those engaged in the profession realized the necessity for the admission of trainees, and from the outset it was to the young they had to look. Most boys love climbing. In early youth there is usually the spirit of adventure, and this was the avenue the master steeplejack had to follow. Catch them young was his motto, for it was no use in a general way attempting to train people in adolescence. By that time, their nerve was not so strong, but if one had been trained from early youth—well the job became more or less second nature, though at no time must familiarity breed contempt. INTEGRAL PART OF INDUSTRY. To.day the steeplejack is an essential and integral part of industry. Without him, catastrophies could happen. It is the steeplejack who is the "backroom boy" concerning the safety of high buildings, church spires, chimneys, and all those structures which lift their heads into the heavens. Like every other profession, advances have been made in technique in the intervening years from those early days when courage and a knowledge of building technique were the main essentials. Specialized knowledge gained from years of experience, the improvements effected in steeplejack equipment, which to-day carries the generally accepted term of "plant", have all played their part in the building of a system which must conform to the economics of the present generation and industrial requirements. No longer can the old-fashioned hold place. The steeplejack or the firm employing him must have marched with the times, otherwise restoration costs would be prohibitive. Is the trade of a steeplejack hereditary ? Yes, in some ways it is, but there are recruits to*day from families who have never had any previous experience of working