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The home decorator and color guide by Rockwell Kent
Page 22
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Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971. The home decorator and color guide by Rockwell Kent - Page 22. 1939. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/2115/show/2108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971. (1939). The home decorator and color guide by Rockwell Kent - Page 22. Architectural Retail Catalog Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/2115/show/2108

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971, The home decorator and color guide by Rockwell Kent - Page 22, 1939, Architectural Retail Catalog Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/2115/show/2108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The home decorator and color guide by Rockwell Kent
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971
Publisher Fairfax Bros. Co.
Date 1939
Description A 24-page booklet published in 1939 called “The Home Decorator and Color Guide” by Rockwell Kent. Content includes paint swatches, color illustrated text on home decoration, colored drawings of living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms, and kitchens.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Color in interior decoration
  • Interior decoration
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • interior designs
  • house designs
  • color guides
  • painting
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
  • catalogs (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location NC975.K3 H6 1939
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b5662044~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Catalog Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name aapam_201301_011_025.jpg
Transcript peacock green—all except one which, for the fun of it, I painted pink. So far, so good. And then one day I discovered an old ship's figure-head in somebody's back-yard. It was a girl, of course—they mostly are —but quite forlorn, impoverished and unkempt. I couldn't buy her, so I borrowed her. I washed and scraped and sanded her; I painted her skin an ivory white, put roses in her cheeks, made hair and eyebrows black, pencilled her eyes; I hung gold pendants from her ears and a necklace around her throat; I clothed her in splendour. And so that all people should love to come to our house, I put her up over the front door from where she looked out day and night over that sea which had once been her world. Yet my bedizening was her undoing. Years later, going upon some errand into a fashionable antique shop in New York, I saw her once again. She wore the gown, roses, jewels I had given her. She was for sale, and I was poor. She cut me dead. In "Wilderness" (Do read it! adv.) is told how I went to Alaska with my little son; how we sought a homestead of some sort, and on an island where stood an abandoned goat cabin found it. How we cleaned the cabin, laid a floor, and stuffed the walls—the spaces between logs—with moss. How we made our furniture—and what we made. How, throughout that fall and winter there, we worked to make that place more—always more—be home. And what a home we made! God decorated it—with snow and ice. From the wide eaves he let the White for ice; Spanish Blue for the sea water drip and freeze till icicles that touched the drifts curtained the bare windows. High on a spur of Mt. Equinox, in Vermont, lay a farm that, in allusion to the Biblical land of plenty, had in old days been called Egypt. Egypt we bought. We got: a cave that is one of the wonders of the Northeast, a spring that was like ice in summer and in winter never froze, and a view that lent the weary soul new wings. And we got a house—or what had passed for one. Its cellar walls were heaps of stones, the sills were dust, its ridge hung like a hammock hitched to stars. No more forlorn old shack still habitable ever stood. We lived in it. Let two years pass. On a smooth green shaded lawn flecked by the sunlight that filters through over-arching maples, stands a house whose type, dotting the hills and valleys of New England, has helped to make that pastoral countryside among the loveliest of the world. It is pure white, this house; its dazzling, sunlit gable deepens the blue sky and enriches the environing green of meadow-land and forest. A simple, honest, unpretentious house, the farm house type, quite unadorned but by—and not without significance — a Georgian motif around the doorway. Welcome, the open door proclaims. It was clear upon entering that those who lived there had, in fact, little but hospitality to offer. The rooms—those rooms we entered first—were small, the ceilings low; the furniture was in general either obviously home-made or of that nondescript variety that poor relations with small choice fall heir to. Comfortable enough, we ad- 22