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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961
Image 6
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 6. June 1961. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/973.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1961). The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/973

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 6, June 1961, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/973.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. X, No. 14, June 1961
Contributor (Local)
  • Deshayes, Mabel
  • Deshayes, Bob
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1961
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9846
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f015_006_006.jpg
Transcript Page 6 BravoJ We are happy to learn of the newly formed bird group in Beaumont. Mrs. Frances Wier reports 127 species counted on their field trip of April 23 with 13 observers; along with the more common warblers, they report the Palm and eleven Blackpoll. AN AVIAN MYSTERY - by Ruth Kershner A raucous squawk over the driveway brought us out at 7 p.m. on May 1 to flush a very large, slowly-flapping bird from a pine tree, and for 30 minutes, to watch a courtship unfold. The bird chose another pine a dozen yards away, and began pacing deliberately back and forth°na level bare limb 60 feet up. He was all gray, with a bright yellow, almost an orange crown, long rosy legs paling to pink at the feet, and a long,heavy, horn-colored beak. Again a squawk was heard, 100 feet away. Instantly the bird faced the sound, responded with a soft croak, and made a bow so low the curve of his long neck touched the branch, at the same time erecting a most extraordinary full-length "cape" of narrow, stiff, curved, palish feathers, straight up from his shoulders. The whole ritual was repeated at 15-second intervals a score of times. Then, enter a third heron from stage right,squawkingj after a few more paces, our hero, too, flew squawking toward the enticing off-stage voice. The next day, the three herons were still near, and were laying the foundations of a nest at least 60 feet high in a pine. By May It, two birds had developed a routine of nestbuilding, and kept at it all day in leisurely fashion. One bird flew away to a tree with dead twigs, perhaps visiting several sources before trying to break off an 18" length, sometimes as big as your thumb, by grasping it in his bill and pulling it toward him. If several tries failed to break it, he tried another, and finally flew with one to the nest tree. Landing a dozen feet away, he walked, hopped, and edged! his awkward offering to the nest. The homemaker, who had been waiting patiently,-arranged it carefully, then rearranged it, then moved it several times, while he watched with interest. After they both contemplated it quietly for a while, he * started off again. Each cycle took about five minutes the first day, about 15 the fourth day. May 7, the bird finally sat down and tried out the new nest, but building continued. For the most part, the twigs were placed almost vertically, the nest was shallow and about 30 inches across. On May 9, the sitting bird was very quiet, with the membrane drawn over the iris, and about 6 p.m. the two birds exchanged positions, both prodding -and shaking the twigs. On May 10, at least one, and perhaps two, pale turquoise eggs could be seen through the loose sticks and one bird spent several hours motionless on the nest. Early morning seemed to be the most active period. The two birds were observed repeatedly changing shifts with much ceremony. The off-duty heron would step to the edge of the nest, and raising his cape, he would run his bill through the neck feathers of his matej she responded with identical movements and then changed places. Up to now we had arbitrarily called the one on the nest "she" and the other "he". Perhaps the left head—plume of one was an inch shorter than the left head-plume of the other, and one observer thought one bird a little smaller than the other, but we really could not tell them apart. By May 12 the yellow crown of one had faded to almost whiteo On the 13th, lltth and 15th, only the sitting bird was seen, but around 8 a.m. on May 16 there were again two, both birds actively adding to the nest. On the 17th, two other night herons spent time near the nest, squawking and flying, apparently without disturbing the original pair. All four were seen again the 18th but that was the last day more than one bird was seen. Late in the afternoon of the 19th, the bird with the paler crown got out of the