Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961
Image 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 2. June 1961. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/969.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1961). The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/969

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961 - Image 2, June 1961, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/976/show/969.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 10, No. 14, June 1961
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. X, No. 14, June 1961
Contributor (Local)
  • Deshayes, Mabel
  • Deshayes, Bob
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1961
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9846
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f015_006_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dear Mabel & Bobs Late in the afternoon on May 23rd a Baltimore oriole was singing in my neighborhood, and I finally located him perched in a Sycamore tree just across the street from my house. The weather on that day was unsettled — gusty winds — hail in some sections of town — and several inches of rain reported in Pasadena and at the air port. On account of the turbulent weather I thought the oriole was a late migrant brought down during the storm. However, up to the present date (June ll+, 1961) this individual has remained in the neighborhood and hardly a day has passed that I have not heard him singing, usually very early in the morning or late in the afternoon, from one of the six Sycamore trees in my block. On May 27th Leota Stilwell heard his beautiful song and on June 10th he was seen chasing one of the many resident mockingbirds from his favorite tree. Hope this will prove to be a nesting record - but so far I have not found the female or the nesti ■— N.Oates From Outer Spaces /Oklahoma John O'Neill was re-elected vice-president of the Cleveland County Bird Club in their recent elections. /Florida Grant MacNichols is settled in Viro Beach for Houston O.G'ers who will visit him has a phone — JO 2-3909. He is staking out Florida specialties He lives at 1031 Miracle Mile and FIELD TRIP TO EAST GALVESTON BAY AREA - May 28, 1961 by Clinton Snyder The conditions for the field trip to East Galveston Bay were rather auspicious. Two days previous, an extraseasonal norther moved across Texas bringing record low temperatures and gusty northerly winds with occasional rain in thunderstorms. By Sunday however, the winds had again become southeasterly and a clear night had probably favored the departure of most of the lingering migrants. It was with these prospects that a group of diehard birders met at the Bolivar FBrry. Actually; we were rewarded even before the trip began when a group of 100/ Dunlin were founds at the East Jetties. They were all in beautiful spring plumage. The trip began at 9s30 when three cars containing Peg and Jack Smith, Louise and Henry Hoffman, and Linda and Clinton Snyder boarded the Bolivar Ferry. The porpoises easily highlighted this crossing; however, a count of 57 Brown Pelicans is quite notable after the disasterous 1957 season. Once on the peninsula, we followed the b each for about a mile noting only a Reddish Egret and another Dunlin and an unidentified species of land crab. Back on Hwy 87, we stopped at a house surrounded by liveoaks which had been productive on a previous trip. This time the trees were alive with Orchard Orioles, brilliant males and females and noisy young. The trees lining the driveway had dozens of nests, probably mostly unoccupied but still a sizable breeding colony. Singing in liveoaks were two Red-eyed Vireos. Next bird to be seen was a Brown Thrasher which on May 28 and one-fourth mile from the Gulf was totally unexpected. Taking a hint that migration might still be observable, we hastened to High Island. As its name implies, High Island is raised in elevation about 25' from the surrounding marsh. Perched on V. the top of a salt dome is vegetation of live oaks and thickets unrivaled for 20 miles around. Indeed, migratory conditions on this "island" might easily exceed Galveston during a wave. On the NE corner of the island we birded in a beautiful stand of live oaks with just enough intermediate growth to provide cover and not enough to impede travel. In the crowns of the live oaks a small group of migrants fed almost impercept- ably. Out of this small supply we gleaned a Blackburnian Warbler, Gray-cheeked and Olive-backed Thrush, a Veery and at least 20 Red-eyed vireos. After lunching in the shade of the oaks, we continued north on Hwys.1985 and 562 to Ft. Anahuac Park. Passing rice fields which in previous years would have harbored numerous Fulvous Tree Ducks, we were only able to find two. Ft. Anahuac Park is wooded and overlooks the entrance to Turtle Bay. A steep slope to the water is overgrown with underbrush, providing nesting area for such birds as Yellow-billed Cuckoos and Orchard Orioles. Thirty feet below stretches a great expanse of marsh where we heard the distinctive song of the Long-billed Marsh Wren and easily saw many species of herons.