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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 3. April 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1963). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/955

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 3, April 1963, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/955.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 12, April 1963
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9848
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f021_004_003.jpg
Transcript The area around a dry tank, with low trees and shrubs, provided a change of habitat when we returned to lower ground. Jim Ellis spotted the first Verdin seen, and we were able to observe it briefly and listen to its song. Their interesting and unusual nests were numerous, and Ella Wolfer and Eva Gilman literally came face to face with one of the small birds as they peered into the entrance to its home. A Barn Owl flushed from the bushes as we walked by, and Olive Sparrows and Hummingbirds (sp.) were also seen in this area. It was mid-afternoon when we turned back toward George West, and immediately Ash-throated Flycatchers and a 5-ft„ Western Dliamond-back Rattler (the first of three) were encountered. Eva Gilman caught a glimpse of a covey of Scaled Quail and we all took to the cactus again to track them down. Here we found nests of Cactus Wrens and one of the Curve-billed Thrasher containing three blue-green eggs. The cars separated somewhat on the return trip, and Linda Snyder and Midge Susie reported a Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Clay-colored Sparrow, and a flock of 200 Lark Buntings. Sunday morning was clear, warm, and windy, and we started early over our same course. Since it was the only water in the area, we stopped again to check the tank, and the sight of strangers with scopes and binoculars peering over the fence attracted the attention of the property owner, Mr. Houdmann. We quickly and gratefully accepted his friendly invitation to drive in for a closer look. A large flock of Lark Buntings, with some Lapland Longspurs accompanying, scattered over his fields, but our main attention was directed to the water, where distant observation had suggested an interesting bird. We were not to be disappointed either, when a careful search produced a pair of Cinnamon Teal, the male a beautiful reddish-brown in the sun. Gadwall, Ruddy, and Ring-necked Ducks in addition to Common Gallinules and Lesser Yellowlegs were added to those seen here the Previous day. For this bone-dry country, we felt that we had done pretty well with water birds. With the Gilmans in the lead car, we started down the road again, with repeat stops at some of the interesting spots of the previous day. Ground Dove, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, and White-necked Raven were checked off. Our birding time came to a close as the remaining "hard core" lunched by the Leona River at Tilden. Unwilling to give up, a brief post-prandial excursion along the banks of the river disclosed Carolina Wrens, Ruby- crowned Kinglet, and a Fox Sparrow by Ella Wolfer. As we completed our trip list, we counted 73 species including 13 sparrows, 7 ducks, 6 hawks, 4 flycatchers, 3 wrens, 3 thrashers, 3 doves, and 2 quail. Clayton Gilman was a most enthusiastic and helpful leader for the congenial groupwhich included Linda Snyder, Midge Susie, Ruby and Tom Daniel, Luta Buchanan, Edna Miner, Mary Belle and Frank Kokesh, Eva and Clayton Gilman, Ella Wolfer, Helen Wolfer, Betty and Paul Caillet, Pat and Jim Ellis, and Jean and Bill Harwell. It was a memorable trip for all but especially thrilling for those of us birding in that country for the first time. We'll long remember the stately Yucca, the fragrant Mountain Laurel, and those sharp thorns on everything. What more can we say except that the weekind provided Jean with 14 lifers and Bill with 13!! Say, do you think those titmice we heard could have been the Black-crested variety? We'd better go back and see. LETTERS Following the recent trip to George West, Mary Belle and I spent most of Monday, March 25, at Garner State Park. It is a very attractive park in many ways and at this season we practically had the place to ourselves. Mr. Ross Hopkins, a semi-retired park attendant, is very much interested in birds and attracts them to his back porch by shining a light at night so as to accumulate a multitude of moths, upon which the birds feed the following morning. He and the park manager were very appreciative of a list of some 30 we saw during the day. Two days at Prade Ranch yielded 60 species. Among the specialties were Golden-cheeked Warblers, Rock and Canon Wrens, Black Phoebes, and close looks at Cliff Swallows in and about their nests on the cliff overhanging