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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 2. April 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1963). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/954

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963 - Image 2, April 1963, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/967/show/954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 12, April 1963
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 12, April 1963
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9848
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f021_004_002.jpg
Transcript 2 ABOUT THOSE SHEETS OF WHITE PAPER Attached to this month's Spoonbill, you will find two sheets of white paper. Printed thereon is a bar graph of the seasonal occurrence of the birds in this area as given in Steve Williams' book. The graph was made by Loren McDaniel and Bob Braden and they have given us permission to reproduce the graph and to distribute it. The solid lines indicate that the bird's relative abundance during the times indicated by the vertical columns is 1-3. The broken lines indicate 4-5. Six (6) and 7 are not indicated. The circled dots give the dates of out of season occurrences. Category 8 is not included in the graph. If you wish to refer to the book for more information about a particular bird, the small column to the left of the bird names gives the page number. The graph is printed so that by cutting the sheets down the center will give you four pages approximately the size of the book. Whenlthe sheets are cut, the information follows sequentially from front to back through the four pages. All of you Spoonbill receivers who don't have a copy of Steve's book better get one so that you'll have the rest of the good poop. And, if you see a Purple Finch on Marchi13th and a Summer Tanager on October 13th, how will you know whether or not it is a record? 0. G. FIELD TRIP TO GEORGE WEST March 23-24 Bill and Jean Harwell This was our first trip to George West and we were not disappointed. We - checked in at the Buenos Nobhes Motel about lis30 PM Friday, and found names such as Snyder, Miner, and Kokesh already on the register. Our 7:00 AM meeting time became breakfast time as we all arrived at Ferguson's Cafe about then. Mary Belle and Frank Kokesh took the lead until the Gilman's arrived. Taking Highway 281 North out of town, we turned off to the Southwest to begin birding in earnest. Lark and Vesper Sparrows abounded in the fields and along the roadsides, and suddenly, Pyrrhuloxia (lifer!) A water containing tank wasfeund (the only one we were to see on the entire trip); and close scrutiny through the scopes at some distance produced Shovelers, Lesser Scaup, Blue-winged Teal, and Pied-billed Grebes. The caravan stopped again as a Sage Thrasher flew across in front of us, and all piled out for a better look. A golden-fronted Woodpecker hammered on a fence post nearby. Traching the Thrasher,we found an opening in the fence and trespassed a little, finding two Say's Phoebes and a Bewick's Wren at brush piles in the field. About that time we also found the Gilman's, or at least they found us, and our party was complete. Pauses at intervals as we went along the road produced Vermillion Fly-' catchers, Caracara, Curve-billed and Long-billed Thrashers, Inca Doves, Song and White-crowned Sparrows. Reaching unfenced country, we took to the brush for a better look. Texas mountain laurel was in full bloom, and conical spires of Yucca gleamed in the sun. We were fortunate to have expert botanists in the group to identify the many varied desert blossoms for us. Photographers were busy with plants as well as birds. The beauty of the blooming desert helped to dull the pain of the many thorns encountered at every step! A Harris* Hawk, the first of many seen, obliged us for a long look through the scope, and later two Swainson's Hawks were seen overhead. A single Black-headed Oriole was seen in this area, while Black-throated Sparrows were common. Cassin's Sparrows were added to the list. Moving on to the Carrone Ranch, all agreed that lunch was in order. In this land without shade, we spread our fare in an opening in the brush at the foot of a low butte, and what food was brought forth! Helen Wolfer had prepared a complete banquet for her party, and graciously shared delicious potato salad and peanut brittle with those of us less fortunate. Some of the lucky ones also enjoyed home-made pimiento cheese a la Mary Belle Kokesh. But even these delights could not deter good birders long, and soon interesting sounds nearby called us up and over the butte through cactus and thorns. More Pyrrhuloxias, Black-throated Sparrows, and Sage Thrashers were seen, and the Green-tailed Towhee and Cactus Wren were added.