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The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 1959
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 1959 - Image 5. June 1959. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/900/show/886.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1959). The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 1959 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/900/show/886

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 1959 - Image 5, June 1959, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/900/show/886.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 1959
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. VIII, No. 2, June 1959
Contributor (Local)
  • Hoffman, Louise
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1959
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 11
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9844
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f011_006_005.jpg
Transcript page 3 turbing manner. I stepped on no less than five, and Dudley managed to find three others in the same manner. The count terminated at around 11:10 a.m. when two happily saturated birdwatchers < accompanied by a soggy "Peterson" and several pounds of cattails emerged with the following statistics: We found (6£) sixty-fswio occupied nests representing (6) species - SPECIES Coot Fulvous tree duck Pied-billed grebe Common gallinule Boat-tailed grackle Hed-wlnged blackbird Total: . OF NESTS HO. OF EGGS HO. OF YOUNG 22 2 138 14 8 0 17 2 79 6 0 8 16 37 0 15 0 62 nests 274 eggs 31 young COOT: I do not know the nesting status of the coot in Texas. Dr. Williams informs me that he has observed young ooots in the Valley area and some years ago on Galveston Island (East) There is no record for the whole state of Louisiana (see Louisiana Birds by George H. Lowery Jr.) The nests we found of this bird were made of cattails bent down to form a cupped platform. The eggs were (1.9 X 1.3) • dirty stone white in color finely flecked with blackish brown. (Measurements from Pough) PIED-BILLED GREBE: We actually saw only three pied-billed grebes. I was truly amazed to find so many nests. Each nest contained from one to eight eggs, the average being five. Only one nest contained 8 eggs. Every grebes nest found was covered (presumably by the parent bird as it slipped off) by decayed cattails. All of them were floating. The eggs were unmarked except for the stains of water plants. FULVOUS TREE DUCK: Both nests were made of cattails and were supported by surrounding vegetation - not floating as the coots and grebes were. One nest contained 10 eggs, the other 4. No lining of feathers was used as in so many other species of ducks. BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE: From two to five eggs or young, the average being three. The nests were swung between supports. All but one nest were located in salt cedar, one in sedge bed. COMMON GALLINULE: Two nests both were smaller and better hidden than the majority of coots, though they were constructed in a like manner. One nest had five eggs in it, the other but one. RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: Two nests were nearing completion, the third was already finished but no eggs were to be found. Birds seen in, on, or over the marsh: SPECIES 1. Dickcissel 2. Coot* 3. Blue-winged teal 4. Ruddy duck 5. Little blue heron 6. Long-billed marsh wren 7. Black tern 8. Barn swallow 9. Rough-winged swallow 10. Tree swallow 11. Fulvous tree duck 12. Pied-billed grebe 13. Blaok-neoked stilt 14. Eared grebe 15. Sora rail 16. Greater yellowlegs 17. Pectoral sandpiper 18. Ring-billed gull 19. Purple gallinule 20. Common gallinule 21. Gull-billed tern 22. Lesser scaup 23. Purple martin 24. Least bittern COUNT 1 60 plus 40 plus 1 7 3 7 8 2 2 28 3 3 3 11 7 23 3 11 11 5 1 3 15 Submitted: T. B. Feltner