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The Spoonbill, Vol. 37, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 37, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988 - Image 2. June 1988 - July 1988. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/815/show/808.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1988 - July 1988). The Spoonbill, Vol. 37, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/815/show/808

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 37, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988 - Image 2, June 1988 - July 1988, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/815/show/808.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 37, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVII, No. 6 - 7, June - July 1988
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1988 - July 1988
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 3
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9873
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f003_006_002.jpg
Transcript by Noel Pettingell 20 YEARS AGO/FROM JULY 1968 SPOONBILL "AUSTIN~The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has taken the first steps to protect the vanishing Red-cockaded Woodpecker and add it to the rare and endangered species list, according to Robert G. Mauermann, deputy director of the Department. The list is compiled by the Committee on Rare and Endangered Wildlife Species, Bureau of Sports Fisheries and Wildlife of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The list contains approximately 100 species of...birds, fish, mammals, reptiles and amphibians considered... to be...in danger of extinction. "The plight of the small woodpecker was brought to light recently by long-time Department Wildlife Biologist Dan Lay, stationed in Nacogdoches. Lay, who has been studying the Red-cockaded Woodpecker for approximately 20 years, said the species, once fairly abundant in the southern pine forests of the United States, is becoming rare and may be doomed in East Texas because of its habitat requirements. Of the several species of woodpecker in the state, only the Red-cockaded requires a living pine vigorous enough to produce gum freely but over 80 years of age and decadent enough to have redheart disease, a fungus that softens and pemeates the trees heartwood with small holes and damages the value of the wood»«_aBd] eventually kills—the-tree. "The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is zebra-backed and has a black cap. The male's red cockade is tiny, almost invisible. Similar species include the Red- bellied Woodpecker which also has a zebra back but may be distinguished by a red cap. The Red- cockaded Woodpecker is more likely to be confused with a Downy or Hairy Woodpecker but the white cheek patch is the distinguishing mark, according to Peterson's 'Field Guide to the Birds of Texas.' "Lay, as well as ornithological publications, says the woodpecker unerringly seeks out old pines with redheart to chip out nesting sites. Once a suitable cavity has been excavated in the tree, the bird waits until sticky pine sap exudes from the wound and surrounds the entrance, then builds its nest. Lay said the sap protects the birds' nesting site from other birds and predators. 'How the bird unerringly finds a pine tree with redheart is a mystery,' Lay said. 'Man first finds redheart when the tree dies or is cut for the mill.' The bird prefers trees in a park-like surrounding, such as old stands of long- leaf pine. Seldom will the birds inhabit trees in the heavier, darker areas of a pine forest. The inability to adapt to changing habitat conditions has been listed as the underlying cause for the extinction of many species, including the Dinosaur. "Lay said the type of trees required by the Red-cockaded Woodpecker are customarily cut by landowners and sent to the mill because of the slow growth rate and because the redheart disease will ...kill the tree and make it useless as saw timber. "But the woodpecker's plight has not fallen on deaf ears. Meetings between the Department personnel and the U.S. Forest Service has secured a de gree of protection for such trees in four national forests in Texas consisting of 657,000 acres. John Courtenay of Lufkin, Supervisor of the Texas National Forests, says saving such trees in the national forests fits very well in the Service's program of wise multiple use of forestlands and that this program has already been added to their operation manuals. 'It's a small thing to protect an inhabited tree or one that is desirable for the endangered woodpecker,' he said. 'I've seen eight of the trees and four of the birds.1 Courtenay says the service plans to locate and map inhabited trees as well as those which would make suitable habitat and preserve them for future use of the woodpecker. —From the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department NEWS LETTER dated 5-8-68." BRAZORIA NWR SUMMER WEEKENDS Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge has added additional "open house" weekends to this year's schedule. The first weekend of every month, not just October through May, will be an "open house" weekend, when birders can visit the refuge between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. without previous arrangement. This refuge offers interesting birds all year. It is most generous of them to add these extra weekends. Take County Road 227 off FM 523 between Angle- ton and Freeport to reach the refuge. SPECIAL REQUEST - OWL PELLETS by Birtl HeClure I have an interest in examining owl pellets for the purpose of determining the animals used as food by owls and the ranges of the animals that are preyed upon by owls. It is requested that anyone who encounters or is aware of owl roosts and is willing to collect pellets for this effort please contact me. This can be on a periodic or one-time basis for this long-term project. Thanks. Bill McClure, 6218 Doliver, Houston TX 77057. Office phone 875-1400, home 781-1639. PROGRAM AND ALUMINUM CHAIRMEN NEEDED The Ornithology Group resumes its monthly meetings starting in August. Ed Rozenburg, our new Ornithology Group Chairman has set up some programs for the coming year, but he needs a Program Chairman to fill out the schedule. Here is your chance to set up some programs you have been wishing for. Also, anyone who has taken slides of birds on a vacation trip and would like to present a program, let the Chairman know. We need an Aluminum Chairman as well. Aluminum is now bringing a good price, and this addition to our treasury is very important. It can provide our donation to the Breeding Bird Atlas for the year, for example. MEMBERS: Collect your drink cans and bring them to the August meeting. Volunteers for the chairmanships please contact Ed Rozenburg at the August meeting or at 481-4695.