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The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 8, October - November 1999
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 8, October - November 1999 - Image 3. October 1999 - November 1999. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/72/show/64.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1999 - November 1999). The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 8, October - November 1999 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/72/show/64

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 8, October - November 1999 - Image 3, October 1999 - November 1999, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/72/show/64.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 48, No. 8, October - November 1999
Contributor (Local)
  • Smith, Donna Kay
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1999 - November 1999
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9884
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f001_007_003.jpg
Transcript Chairman's Message continued.... We need your input! Robin Gray, the ONC Membership Vice President, has been transferred out of state and will vacate his position as an .flicer ofthe ONC. Robin was also the person most responsible for getting your Spoonbill mailed to you. We have a solution that will actually improve the time it takes to get your Spoonbill and won't require any extra work from the OG. We have found a bulk mail company that will process the Spoonbill and mail them for us. They will get them from the printer and get them to the US Post Office in about two days. This should get the Spoonbill to you about five days sooner. Too good to be true? Not really, but it's not free. It's going to cost about 14 cents a Spoonbill to do this. We have the funds to do this for the rest ofthe year (3 more issues of The Spoonbill) but we will need a dues increase of $2 per year to cover this in 2000. This means your dues will now be $14 for the OG, and $8 for the ONC for a total of $22. fairly close to the prey before beginning the attack. The method gives the impression of walking past, rather than directiy toward the prey. Hence, "diagonal approach". In examining this situation, you'll see that a trick like this might help us birders to position ourselves (without the attack) so that we get a great look. In many cases, you can move close enough to get a better look or photograph than you would get if you approached the bird directly. Viewing and photographing is improved when the light is just right and when there are few obstacles. With the right planning, you can pick your spot, taking all these things into consideration. Here's what to do. First, of course, note the location of the bird. Look around to find a spot from which your view will be the best. Now, imagine a line from your current position to the point you have chosen and even through it. Relocate before begirining if the line cannot be traversed. Proceed very slowly along the line. Pause occasionally to look or take a photo, but don't turn your body toward the bird just your head. When you arrive at the point you chose, pause and look some more. Continue along the same line and keep pausing to look. Try it, it works for the Cheetah. I intend to put this to a vote at the next OG meeting. If you would like to have input into this please be sure to attend this meeting. Beginning Birding About "Beginning Birding" and "Sneaking Up' Don Richardson About "Beginning Birding" In a brief e-mail discussion between myself, your chairman and your editor, we decided to create a series of articles directed toward beginning birding. The material will range from help tor the rank beginner to an intermediate level. Some of you may already be familiar with much of it. We hope you will find the articles interesting and helpful. We want your comments, so please let us know what you think. "Sneaking Up" Years ago, I read an account in a National Geographic book about Africa. It described a procedure the Cheetah uses to approach its prey. It was presented by Louis Leakey, a famous anthropologist who has done much of his work on the African continent. He called the Cheetah's approach a "diagonal approach". The Cheetah can run extremely fast but only for a fairly short distance. In order to succeed in catching its prey, it must find a way to position itself so it is The technique just outlined uses some basic principles that should be followed in all your birding. Remember that birds are very aware of their suTroundingsr ft would be hard to be in an area where you can observe birds and have them not know you are there. The trick is to make them not care that you are there. The best advice I can think of is to be quiet and move slowly. Doing these two things alone will make you more aware ofthe environment you are in and present a situation more comfortable to the birds. This low pressure situation for the birds and higher concentration level for you will greatly contribute to your birding success. Consider what you wear. While I don't think you need to wear full camouflage for regular birding, I would recommend wearing subdued colors. A small group I was with was doing quite well and finding lots of birds. It began to rain a bit and out came the rain slickers. Nearly every one was bright yellow and suddenly we looked like a small flock of very large Prothonotary Warblers. I'd say we should let the birds be the bright ones. Don is a regular writer and lecturer about birds and teaches a beginning birding field course in conjunction with the Houston Audubon Society. Contact him at (281) 997-0485 or cdplace@concentric. net Don't forget! — Don will appreciate your comments! Page 2 October/November 1999. Vol. 48, No. 8 The Spoonbill