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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 7. May 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6990.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6990

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 7, May 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6990.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 1, May 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_005_007.jpg
Transcript Page 7, except on beaches or nearby mudflats, Mr, Emanuel From the editors: Please accept our apologies, PROBLEMS OF THE WHITE-WINGED DOVE, PART;,3 by Hank Robison A quote from Project No, S-1599, Texas Agricultursl Experiment Station: "Thus an abundance of birds, long season, and more generous )sag limit (25 per week, when enforced), coupled with the exBitement of a foreign hunt, numerous favorable newspaper and magazine articles, and advertisements by both Mexican governmental agencies and American hunt organizers have resulted in an increasing number of U.S. citizens hunting in Mexico. In 1968, there were more band recoveries from the Mexico Valley than from the Texas side. Out of a total of 115 Mexican Valley recoveries, 111 were reported by hunters with U.S. addresses or by American hunt organizers. Wildlife Biologists believe that the White-winged Dove is in danger, wings do we need to insure its continued existence? How many White- The threshold of survival of a species is not really determinable. At best we can only estimate (guess) because of widely varying conditions, A close relative of the White-winged Dove is no longer with us. Back in 1914 Whitmer Stone wrote about the Passenger Pigeon in "AUK"s "The reduction of this once abundant bird to absolute extermination by man's greed should be a lesson to us all and stifle all opposition to the efforts now being made by national and state governments in behalf of the conservation of other birds threatened with like fate. What is a little loss of sport to us compared with the extinction of a wild speoies —-something that the hand of man can never replace," With last years White-winged Dove season cut in half, on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande river. only 100,000 Whitewings were killed The reduction of the hunting season was a commendable action on the part of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and indicates that they too, are concerned about this bird. However, the Whitewing's bad luck continued to follow it, U.S. hunters crossed over to the Mexico side of the Rio Grande Valley to take advantage of the Mexican liberal bag limits, long hunting season, and not too much enforcement of game laws. Large U.S, companies used their planes to ferry in hunting parties. Commercial organizers staged hunts on private ranches. Carloads of hunters crossed the border to get their birds. As the Whitewings made their flights back and forth to feeding areas across the river, destruction was waiting for theml We cannot depend on Mexico to provide food or nesting habitat for the Whitewing. Nor can we hope that Mexico will protect it with strict game laws and their enforcement. IT IS UP TO US, If the White-winged Dove is to survive, WE will have to see to it. On a bluff overlooking the confluence of the Mississippi and Wisconsin rivers, the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology erected a nomument. The words on the attached bronze plate ares "Dedicated to the last Wisconsin Passenger Pigeon. Shot at Babcock, Sept. 1899. This speeies became extinct through the avarice and^thoughtlessness of man." Ladies and Gentlemen a questions last Whit_v„in__d Dove? Where shall we build our monument—dedicated to the ZOO-RAISED FULVOUS TREE DUCK RECOVERED IN VERA CRUZ, MEXiqO from Edward L„ Flickinger, Wildlife Research Biologist Last July and September about 100 zoo-raised fulvous tree ducks were marked and released in Texas in hopes that they would join and move with wild birds. Most apparently did, though one joined a flock of chickens near the release point in Wharton Co. and another joined some captive tree ducks near Lafayette, Louisiana, One band recovery was from a bird released in September in Wharton County and shot near Katy in Waller County, Texas on November 21. Another released at the same time was Recovered October 21 near Lerdo de Tejada, Vera Cruz, Mexico. These recoveries indicate the release of zoo-raised tree ducks is paying off. We are aware of only 2 other banded.fulvous tree ducks being recovered on the Gulf Coast. One of these was banded in California and recovered the following year in Texass the other was banded in Texas (Jefferson County) and recovered near Iota, Louisiana.