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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 2. May 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6985

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970 - Image 2, May 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6994/show/6985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 1, May 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 1, May 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_005_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2. his vantage point in an oak tree. He was heard to remark that he identified all of the group correctly; which is more than they could say of him. An Ovenbird remarked that several Birders exhibited rather unusual behavior in that they got down on their hands and knees to look him right in the eye, A pair of shrike, feeding their young, reported seeing the group perched on the banks of Buffalo Bayou eyeing a turtle the size of a platter, sunning himself on a log at the edge of the water. Midmorning, the birders returned to the library and were seen roosting on the steps for three-quarters of an hour. They chattered among themselves (the Mockingbird verified that their sounds were a variation of English), interrupting their racket every few minutes to peer through their binoculars. The last sighting was made by a Ye How-breasted Chat, who reported that a half-dozen of them alighted on the north lawn of the library. There they fed for thirty minutes or so, overlooking nothing but a few crumbs. At noon the clean-up crew composed of House Sparrows confirmed that this particular band of Homo sapiens left nothing that could be used for nest building. The resident birds agreed that people-watching therefore, wnuld be of greater interest possibly to migrant birds. Next spring, it is hoped that more of the migrants will accept an invitation to meet with the birders, preferably at the Mulberry- Hilton when the fruit is ripe. THE DANGERS OF MIGRATION by Dirk Hagemeyer Early in April, I made several trips to an offshore drilling platform South East of the Mississippi Delta. During my first visit a norther blew in and within a few hours about a dozen migrants had landed on the platform, With several hundred miles behind them, this must have looked like a haven in that big expanse of empty water. No more struggle against the North Wind, However they did not know that this was a structure of steel, without trees and bushes, grass and soil. Without insects. They were hungry after that long trip and hunted for insects in every nook and cranny. When an occasional mosquito or moth were sighted (don't ask me where these came from) it was clear that these birds were tired, very tired. Most of the time they were not able to catch a moth or to fly more than 25-50 feet. Sometimes they nearly dropped from their perch. They had lost their usual cautiousness, and could be approached to within a few feet. Later in the day one could even pick them up for a closer look. There were 4 male Hooded, 1 male Wilson and a Blue Winged Warbler, 3 White-eyed Vireos, an Ovenbird, and a male Orchard Oriole. The next morning I found 2 dead Hooded Warblers and 4 White-eyed Vireos, what happened to the others I hate to guess. They nearly made their big trip across the Gulf, 20 more miles to go and then were doomed by a drilling platform. Besides these Warblers there were some Tree Swallows, that seemed to find insects just above the water. These appeared healthy and agile. And there was a Green Heron,which was still there a week later, at least I assume they were the same bird. On my second visit a Hummingbird got fooled. There was a truck on the platform with amber running lights. Out of the blue sky a Hummingbird appeared and started tq probe those amber lights for nectar. It only stayed a short time and then went North, The last 20 miles must have seemed very long, but I believe it made them. CATTLE EGRETS by Dirk Hagemeyer In the April Spoonbill, David Marrack mentioned Cattle Egrets in Bellaire. These were not the first ones to visit that city. In February and March of 1969 there were usually 3 to 4 Cattle Egret in some open fields near,,the Pearl Beer place. They are also invading the Koisant International Airport, New Orleans, Recently while landing there in a big jet, I noticed 50-100 Cattle Egret feeding in the grass right along the runways. They did not bother to move when the big jet passed within a 100 feet. How come that these new arrivals to the American continent adapt themselves so well to changing environment, while others like the Snowy Egret barely hang on? A LETTER FROM BESSIE CORNELIUS A birder who performs a "labor of love" is the esteemable Earle R„ Greene of Oxnard, California, who compiles the A.O.U, "600 Club" and his work is to be highly commended, I am inclosing the new Summary and we now have two Texans as members of this exclusive club plus the ex-Texans, Jerry and Nancy Strickling.