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The Spoonbill, Vol. 22, No. 4, August 1973
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 22, No. 4, August 1973 - Image 1. August 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6939/show/6927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1973). The Spoonbill, Vol. 22, No. 4, August 1973 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6939/show/6927

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 22, No. 4, August 1973 - Image 1, August 1973, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6939/show/6927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 22, No. 4, August 1973
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXII, No. 4, August 1973
Contributor (Local)
  • Greenbaum, Laura
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9858
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f016_008_001.jpg
Transcript VOLUME XXII, NO. 4 AUGUST, 1973 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY aMW, OUTDOOR HATURE CLUB, Ho-aTON^rmS NEW.NAMES FOR ;OLD BIRDS - Dr. Kent Rylander This is reprinted from the SCISSORTAIL of the Lubbock Audubon Society: Perhaps everyone does not appreciate how arbitrary ornithologists must be when they assign "official" names to birds. Yet few birders would question the necessity of having uniform names for birds; without some form of standardization, the birdwatching business would sink into utter chaos. For instance, the early settlers of our country gave more than a hundred local names to the flicker. Someone had to arbitrarily choose one of these names as the standard name to be used in bird books. So late in the last century a group of prominent ornithologists appointed a committee "to standardize .forth American bird names. Although the membership of the committee changes with deaths and reappointments, it has been meeting periodically for years to carefully consider necessary name changes for our birds. The committee is under the authority of the American Ornithologists' Union (A_j3.U.), and is so influential that virtually every North American bird book conforms to its names even though some ornithologists may not personally agree with the committee's decisions. Thus we can all understand each other when we talk about a particular bird. The question naturally arises as to why the name of a bird should ever change after it was given its official name years ago. Most of the names do not change, and if you compare the names in a contemporary book with those in a book written in 1900, the majority will be identical. But for rather complex and technical biological reasons, a bird that previously was considered a separate species may now be considered merely a different form of another species. Determining just which species are "good" species and whieh are merely variations of the same species (called "subspecies1') Is no easy matter. Research is constantly in progress to answer these questions and as the results are analyzed, the A.O.U. committee carefully considers them and accordingly makes appropriate changes in the-bird names. In April, a number of such changes appeared in the official publication of the A.O.U., THE AUK. In the future bird books will Incorporate these new names. Also, the official Christmas count names will con- ■ form to the new decisions. This is not to say that we can't recognize the subspecies on field trips, for some of them are quite easily identified. It just means that as far as the official species names are concerned, we should use the current names, Gradually the new names will become familiar and future generations of birdwatchers will find the name "Upland Plover" (now the Upland Sandpiper) as strange-sounding as we find the name "Missouri Skylark" (now the Water Pipit) even today. NEW AOU CHANGES - by Dan Hardy The following changes are only the ones that will affect the Upper Texas Coast situation. Beginning with the September SPOONBILL birds submitted to the Clearing House should conform to these changes. For the first several months the "old" name will be Included after the