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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976
Image 13
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 13. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 13. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6874

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 13, January 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 9, January 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_001_013.jpg
Transcript CHRISTMAS COUNT RESUME by Paul Nimmons, Compil An all-time high number of birders (99) saw the second ever seen on the Houston Christmas Count. highest number of species (171) Almost every area equaled or exceeded its species totals of last year. The inland . areas (1-4) did particularly well compared to last year. Nine species were seen exclusively in these areas: wood duck, sharp-shinned hawk, vermilion flycatcher, brown creeper, wood thrush, eastern bluebird (30), pine warbler, American redstart, LeConte'? sparrow (22). -Other species were seen primarily in these areas: anhinga, Canada goose Cooper's hawk, pileated woodpecker, downy woodpecker, short-billed marsh wren, golden- crowned kinglet, Sprague's pipit, common yellowthroat, Bullock's oriole, black-headed grosbeak, rufous-sided towhee, dark-eyed junco, chipping sparrow, Henslow's sparrow, and swamp sparrow. Almost 5500 or the 8800 snow geese were seen in these four areas (next year they will see a Ross' goose!). These lists show how important the land-locked areas are to the count. It is hard to cover an inland area - particularly walking through a sparrow field - with little opportunity to sit and peer through a spotting scope and little hope of building the largest area list. The leaders and participants in these areas deserve extra credit and a gold star. This does not mean the other areas should be overlooked. In all II areas thirty- three species (commonly called "exclusives") were seen in no more than one area. Seven species were sighted which had not been seen on any of the five preceding counts (1970- 1974, the only years checked): white-faced ibis, sandhill crane, pectoral sandpiper, inca dove, Anna's hummingbird (certainly the best bird of the count- seen by Linda Snyder at her feeder), ;tern kingbird, and vermilion flycatcher. The following six birds had only been seen once in the preceding five years: American bittern, king rail, Virginia rail, Philadelphia vireo, American redstart and Bullock's oriole. We saw every species that can reasonably be expected except gull-billed tern, black skimmer, rufous hummingbird, red-headed woodpecker (a sad loss), hairy woodpecker and black & white warbler. Hopefully we will pick these up again next year together with increased numbers of wood ducks and roseate spoonbills. Sixty-five species were seen in their highest numbers for the six Christmas counts from 1970 - 1975: common loon, red-throated loon, horned grebe, eared grebe, oliva- ce ous cormorant, green heron, cattle egret (its rise over a six-year period has been 30, 36, 91, 105, 174, 280), yellow-crowned night heron (previous high was 3), Canada goose, snow goose (previous high was 3792), blue goose, mottled duck (previously 62), gadwaI I, pintail (previously 1112), American wigeon (previously 127), shoveler, lesser scaup, common goldeneye (doubled previous high), bufflehead, ruddy duck (more than double), turkey vulture, Cooper's hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, king rail, clapper rail (almost double), common gallinule, American coot.(previously 226) killdeer, black-bellied plover, woodcock, spotted sandpiper (previously 26), willet (double), least sandpiper (seventupled), American avocet (quadrupled), laughing gull, Bonaparte's gull, royal tern, groove-billed ani, screech owl (triped), belted kingfisher, pileated woodpecker, red-bellied woodpecker, yellow-belled sapsucker, blue jay, common crow (double), Carolina chickadee, tufted titmouse, house wren, wood thrush, blue-gray gnatcatcher, ruby-crowned kinglet, water pipit, cedar waxwing, loggerhead shrike, solitary vireo, Philadelphia vireo, orange-crowned warbler, myrtle warbler, meadowlark, Bullock's oriole, great-tailed grackle (previously 274), common grackle (previously 5668), black-headed grosbeak, savannah sparrow, LeConte's sparrow, (almost quadrupled), Henslow's sparrow, chipping sparrow and swamp sparrow. The reason for the wealth of species and high totals is the high number of participants, many of whom are excellent field identifiers, allowing complete coverage of the count circle. Hopefully, we wiI I all remember this when we wake up in a 38° drizzle on Christmas count morning 1976!