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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 6. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6867.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6867

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976 - Image 6, January 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6876/show/6867.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 9, January 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 9, January 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_001_006.jpg
Transcript Page 6 cially when first assuming position; time: 2 pm-2:10 pm; tail white. —Victor Emanuel v| mottled dark brown and Ferruginous Hawk: phone pole—appea of perched bird: and wings—a I I wh dark reddish legs dish barred feath rating yellow bas directions away f see top of taI I). served from 4:00 estimate distance _Whi |e driving.observed large hawk glide in and land on top of tele- red light underwings but did not view with binoculars. Description Buteo shape in flight—brown and black streaked and mottled on back ite below except for faint streaks on breast and faint bars on flanks- factual ly tarso metatarsus) with yellow feet and black claws—red- ers on thighs—hooked beak yellowish at base with whitish area sepa- e from black tip—dark eye with black eye streak that tapers in both rom eye—striped crown—white undertail and without bars (couldn't Conditions for observation: bright sunlight with sun behind us—ob- to 4:30 pm with binoculars 7x35, 7x50, and 8x40 and 15-60 B&L scope— at 75 yards. —Chuck, Suzi and Joan Campbell ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD: Seen at same location, and is presumably same bird Jim and Linda Hargrove reported on Freeport Christmas Count. Male, not in full plumage, green back, "dirty" greenish belly, inverted "V" of color at throat, with just small flecks of color on head. Observed perched at distances varying from 6 ft. to 25 ft, also hovering. —Paul & Margaret Jones LADDER-BACKED WOODPECKER: Location: Bastrop Bayou Woods in Bob Moore's territory of Freeport count area. Habitat: open, mixed deciduous and live oak woods. Description: bird seen was approximately 7 to 8 inches in overall length, distinctly larger than a Downy but smaller than a Red-Belly. Black striping on white face, one black line through eye, one angling away from eye. Red cap on top of head. Nape of neck was black. Distinct black and white barring horizontally across back. Wings when folded also black and white barring, appearing almost "spotted". Chest and belly a grayish- white in color. Beak larger than Down , smaller than Red-Belly's. Voice: Bird repeatedly gave a loud "check" note while working on dead branch of tree. One time the bird emitted a loud rattle of lower pitch than Downy and not as fast. Observers: bird first discovered at edge of woods by Dick Pratt who called me to observe. Bird also observed by a third observer, Bob Moulton. Total observation time was 20 minutes. All observers had 7x50 binoculars. Conditions were bright, early morning sunshine at 8:00 am. —James G. Morgan No details were given on the following: Ross' Goose: (2)6, Warren Lake, Audubon field trip-D&JD,P&MJ Common Merganser: (2)18,Warren Lake; (Ifemale)18,ponds at intersection of Hwy 6 and 90A.,R&FZ Golden Eagle: (5) I 5,south of Clay Rd.—Katy-Hockley junction,R&FZ A VOICE FROM THE PAST Randy Korotev, a member of the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology, as well as the OG, recently passed on to us a copy of an article that appeared in the Summer 1975 issue of THE PASSENGER PIGEON, newsletter of that organization. Written by Dr. Frederick and Dr. Frances Hamerstrom, two of Wisconsin's most respected naturalists and ornithologists, from notes they made in 1939 of a conversation held that year with an old settler, it tells of one man's memories of the "last year of the pigeons", the great Wisconsin Passenger Pigeon nesting of 1871. The old gentleman was 12 or 14 that year, and his job was to sit in the grain field with dog and gun to protect seeding wheai- (sown on top of ground and dragged in). In spite of all efforts in the area, pigeons spoiled crops that year. The birds were easily caught, shot or trapped (ever wonder where the phrase "stool pigeon" came from? It was a live bird "whose feet were fastened to a light board, he thought the feet were passed through holes and fastened underneath, but wasn't sure of the exact method- board was tipped by a pull string—kept in motion so that the stool pigeon kept flapping its wings. They cleared space on the ground, baited with wheat, and a spring pole net was sprung with a pull string from a blind). The breasts were salted down and dried like venison. These were daily taken to school for lunch with bread. "...sitting alongside the field with my dog and the gun never saved the crop; we lost it ALL...them pigeons tasted awful...the meat was so DRY, and it's just about all we ever had in our school lunch—that dry salty meat. 'Course fresh breasts tasted fine and the squabs was nice....there was an awful lot of work for a boy them days—we lost the whole crop—the last year of the pigeons was TERRIBLE".