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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 4. February 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1984). The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6830

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 4, February 1984, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIII, No. 2, February 1984
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9869
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f018_002_004.jpg
Transcript Crested Owl. En route to Merida we took the road to La Libertad and Emiliano Zapata, then out to the main highway. This provided two pair of Aplomado Falcons, a nesting colony of Ringed and Amazon Kingfishers, and hundreds of sunning Iguana lizards. In the "Jabiru Marsh" we had an adult Bare-throated Tiger- Heron, and further along the highway we had a Black-collared Hawk right next to the road in the state of Tabasco. Later, in the state of Campeche, Tony spotted an interesting group of raptors. When we stopped, Tony called our attention to a bird right above us - an adult King Vulture! We finished this day looking at Yucatan Jays and Orange Orioles in the state of Yucatan. On January 11 we departed Merida via Cancun, then on to Houston, all by air. The area around the Cancun airport provided three additional species before leaving Mexico. The final trip total of 403 species included 31 species of raptors, 39_ species of warblers, and 17 species of tanagers. This was one good birding trip! If you can, bird Mexico as soon as possible. Many of our days were spent birding with a background of sound produced by the axe, the machete, and even a chain saw. One only hopes that enough habitat will be left to allow another party to observe over 4 00 species in two weeks in eastern Mexico. Otherwise, many great birding experiences will be lost to others in the future. EL NARANJO CHRISTMAS COUNT Ben Feltner One of the nicest things about the El Naranjo Count is that its location assures one of a warm tropical count day. Situated 22o30'N longitude and 99°24'W latitude, it lies well below the Tropic of Cancer in the land of banana trees, mangoes and papayas. This year, however, they were all dead and the "warm tropical count day" never materialized. The same hard freeze that locked up the U.T.C. partially froze Galveston Bay and played havoc with the Valley's citrus crop did not halt at the border. The "Siberian Express" made a whistle stop of Northeastern Mexico, and its effects were devastating. Around El Naranjo, where such weather is unprecedented, the air was redolent with the odor of freshly dead greenery, and many of the shrubs showed signs of severe "frost burn". Even big strangler figs suffered and had lost their leaves and fruit. Normal bird food crops were, in many cases, gone, but despite all the damage our total count was up over last year; thanks mostly to the influx of good birders and new talent that joined this year's tropical tally-up. Again the Jim Morgan/Tony Gallucci team took honors for the best count bird. This year they were joined by John Eyre and John Raines from England. Mr. Eyre was a former resident of the U.T.C. and was quite active in the O.G. when here. This Anglo- American contingent found a Black Hawk-Eagle (a spectacular bird of prey I have only seen once that far north in 23 years of birding there); and an American Woodcock (recorded only twice before in Mexico). The cold weather to the north was unquestionably responsible for the Woodcock, but the Black Hawk-Eagle remains inexplicable. In all, the Morgan party recorded 125 species including sixteen raptors on the day. Among that total were both Peregrine and Aplomado Falcons. Quite a performance! George and Carol Harmon of Quinlan, Texas teamed up with Bob Behrstock and ferreted out some rather "good" birds themselves. Locating three species of trogons was no small feat, but Violaceous, Elegant and Mountain were all found, in addition, they recorded a sometimes difficult Blue- crowned Motmot, and a pair of Fan-tailed Warblers. The Stone brothers of San Antonio, Byron, Don and Matt, worked the area around El Salto Falls. They also found a pair of Fan-tailed Warblers as well as an Ovenbird, Crimson-collared Grosbeaks and both saltators. The El Salto area was one of the hardest hit by the weather, but still produced S3 species. Another group of El Naranjo rookies, from Houston this time, P. D. Hulce, John LaGrue and Steve Schultz, turned in exclusives in the form of Ruddy Ground Dove, White-throated Robin and Thicket (formerly Rufescent) Tinamou. At El Naranjo everyone gets to contribute, as there are always more birds than birders.