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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 3. February 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6829.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1984). The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6829

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984 - Image 3, February 1984, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6835/show/6829.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 2, February 1984
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIII, No. 2, February 1984
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9869
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f018_002_003.jpg
Transcript EASTERN MEXICO - ONE MORE TIME ... Jim Morgan Is 400 species possible in two weeks of birding in Eastern Mexico? You bet! Tony Gallucci, John Eyre, John Raines and I saw 399 species, and heard four more species, for a total of 4 03 in two weeks of birding from Monterrey to Merida in the eastern Gulf/Caribbean slope habitats of Mexico. Personal highlights of this trip follow. John Eyre and John Raines flew in from England and met Tony and me at the Houston airport on December 27th where we proceeded onward to Monterrey that night. Our birding began on December 28th with roadside observations, and several stops along the way, while en route to Mante in the state of Tamaulipas. Mante was to be our "base" for birding in the El Naranjo area the next two days. El Naranjo, even after five trips there, continues to be one of my favorite Mexican birding areas. This year, even though significant freeze damage had occurred in the area, the birding within the El Naranjo Christmas Count circle was again very good. On our first day we saw nifty Mexican species like Barred Antshrike, Blue Mockingbird, Rufous-browed Peppershrike and Crimson- collared Grosbeak. The highlight of the day was watching 147 (counted!) Military Macaws coming into feed in a row of Chinaberry trees. With a background of a green mountainside these beautiful, very large parrots put on a fantastic show. We watched them for 3 0 minutes while they flew, landed in the trees, fed, preened and just sat as we leisurely observed them with binoculars and scopes as close as 50 to 200 meters. The next day at El Naranjo was the Christmas Count. Our party worked the eastern third of the circle, and while we did not record as many species as last year, we did have some good finds. Best of all were Black Hawk-Eagle and American Woodcock. We also saw other nice birds such as Peregrine, Bat and Aplomado Falcons, Tufted Flycatcher, and Mangrove Swallow. The following day we were en route to Tuxpan, but we made numerous birding stops along the way. We found another'Peregrine before reaching Tampico, and south of Tampico we found a beautiful adult Great Black Hawk and a Gray-necked Wood-Rail. After spending the night in Tuxpan we proceeded on towards Teziutlan. Our route carried us along the coast to Nautla before we turned inland and up into the mountains. Near Nautla we found numerous waders, ducks and shorebirds, including Collared Plover. Also, we found our first Laughing Falcon of the trip just as we turned inland. The rest of the day was spent birding up the slope and into the cloud forest. The following day was the Teziutlan Christmas Count and our party worked the eastern part of the circle. We found two of the area specialties, Emerald Toucanet and Azure-hooded Jay, along with Eye-ringed Flatbill, flocks of White-collared, Chestnut- collared, and Vaux's Swifts, and flocks of euphonias. Our party recorded over 100 species on count day, which turned out to be a real good total for the area we were assigned. We birded one and a half more days before leaving Teziutlan and we had some of our best birding of the entire trip. My highlight was finding a "most wanted" bird - the Chestnut-sided Shrike-Vireo. We found a second one an hour later about a mile away. What a great bird! We also located a beautiful male Aztec Thrush and flocks of Gray Silky Flycatchers, plus such warbler delights as Hooded Yellowthroat, Slate-throated Redstart and Red Warbler. We encountered one massive flock of about 1,000 birds in the highlands which is always one of the highlights of Mexican birding. This flock included hundreds of Pine Siskins, Black-headed Siskins, numerous Bushtits and Mexican Chickadees, plus large numbers of Olive, Townsend's and Hermit Warblers, along with a nice mixture of Mexican species and a few Red Crossbills. It took us over an hour to thoroughly work this flock! While en route to Catemaco we made the traditional stopover east of the city of Veracruz where Aplomado Falcon, Double-striped Thick-Knees, Fork-tailed Flycatcher and Grassland Yellow-Finch were found by the Peregrine Tour just ahead of us. We enjoyed seeing each of these species, even though all were to be seen again later in the trip. Further on towards Catemaco we found two Crane Hawks. We stayed only one day at Catemaco but still we were able to find White Hawk, Collared Aracari, Keel-billed Toucan, Yellow- bellied Tyrannulet, Tawny-crowned Greenlet, and Gray-headed Tanager, along with many other rain forest species. Our next stop was Palenque, in the state of Chiapas, where we spent three full days. This great area provided super birding once again. We birded around the ruins, along the Ocosingo highway, the roads to Chancala and La Libertad, plus the grounds of the Nu-Tu-tun restaurant/hotel. At the ruins we had" two White Hawks soaring, four species of trogons, two Northern Royal Flycatchers, Lovely Cotinga, Red-legged and Green Honeycreepers, plus a host of other species. Along the Ocosingo highway we had a great view of a perched Black Hawk-Eagle, where we could see all of the bird perfectly in the scope. At the far end of the road to Chancala we had eight species of tanagers, including Golden-masked, Scarlet-rumped and Crimson-collared. On the road to La Libertad we had our second Gray-necked Wood-Rail, plus Sandhill Crane and Botteri's (Yellow-carpalled or Peten race) Sparrow. In the whole area we had nine species of hummingbirds during the three days. Also, a real treat was a night of owling when Bob Behrstock of Peregrine Tours called up Mottled Wood-Owl and Black and White Owl, plus we also heard, but did not see.