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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 11, November 1991
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The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 11, November 1991 - Image 2. November 1991. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6807/show/6800.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1991). The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 11, November 1991 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6807/show/6800

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 11, November 1991 - Image 2, November 1991, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6807/show/6800.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. [40], No. 11, November 1991
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXX, No. 11, November 1991
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1991
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9876
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
Note Incorrect volume number, XXXX, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f009_011_002.jpg
Transcript SAM HOUSTON NATIONAL FOREST: Exxon Corporation has joined the U.S. Forest Service to preserve a habitat for an estimated 260 breeding pairs of the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker in four national forests in Texas. Exxon donated $24,400, which will be matched with a federal grant, for the project. Under the plan, the forest service will buy and install nearly 400 artificial nest inserts, as well as a device that will protect the small woodpecker from larger predators. A protection device, call a steel restricter plate, also will be installed to prevent larger and more aggressive species, such as the Pileated Uoodpecker, from taking over or damaging the Red-cockaded Uoodpecker's nest. The Red-cockaded Woodpecker population has dropped along with the number of natural forests...the birds burrow holes for nests in older pine trees [which have been heavily logged]...the birds have been able to find more older pines in public forests. There is no accurate count of the birds, but the forest service estimates there are 260 breeding pairs...in the four national forest within Texas. More than half of that bird population lives within the Sam Houston National Forest, which stretches across Walker, Montogomery and San Jacinto counties. Houston Chronicle, Nov. 1991. 06 MEETING MINUTES, NOVEMBER 4, 1991. Preceding the meeting Don Richardson conducted a Learning Corner session on duck identification. Chairman Bob Honig opened the meeting by inquiring if anyone had ideas about how the aluminum can fund monies should be spent. Ho ideas were presented. David Bradford announced the November field trip details. David also announced the joint OG/ONC field trip plans to the Valley during President's Day weekend, February 15-17, 1992. OG members were encouraged to become involved in the Christmas Bird Counts. Among the counts discussed were Attwater, Dec. 18, Buffalo Bayou, Dec. 21 and Brazos Bend, Dec. 28. Bob's request for notable bird sightings resulted in reports of a Sabine's Gull, a Ross' Goose and a Bullock's Oriole. Gail Luckner introduced the evening's program speaker, Jim Morgan. Jim shared his vast knowledge, skill and personal experience in sparrow identification and behavior. With the assistance of some great detailed slides, Jim discussed features and behaviors which aid in differentiating sparrowa that at first appear to be similar. Overall, Jim made sparrow identification easier in his enlightening program which attracted a large gathering of 06 members. Chriatine Bourgeois, Secretary NOTABLE QUOTE: Rousing Secretary Jack Kemp. "People are not a drain on the resources of the planet.1 Peregrine falcons can fly at 150 mph, but it takes them a while to get up to speed. Upshot: In a rare show of agreement, unions, the builder and the site owner have agreed to stop work on a construction site in Melbourne, Australia, until two peregrine falcon eggs hatch and the chicks are able to fly. In the atate of Victoria the creatures are classified as threatened wildlife. The birds usually nest in rugged country on cliffs or in high tree hollows. This rooftop nest is said to be rare. Quoth a wildlife offider: "To have them in the city is unbelievable." The Houston Post, Sept. 1991. FAIRFIELD--Only 90 miles south of Dallas, Fairfield Lake State Park offers fishing and swimming in a sandy- bottomed, heated lake of a power plant, and in the winter visitors often observe one or more of the 22 Bald Eagles that have been observed to spend the cold months at this warm water refuge. The park has 135 primitive, water-only and water and electric campsites. Backpackers and hikers can follow more than six miles of maintained trails that lead to the primitive camping areas. There is also a bird watching trail developed and maintained by a local Boy Scout troup. Stately oaks, hickories, cedar and elm trees mark the transition zone between the pine forests to the east and prairie grasslands to the north and west. Texas Parks and Wildlife News. NOEL'S NICHE LOOKING BACK Bv Noel Pettingell 10 YEARS AGO/FROM NOVEMBER 1981 SPOONBILL PARTICIPATION IS THE KEY (AN EDITORIAL) The Audubon Christmas Bird Count is a truly unique phenomenon. It is as traditional to birdwatching as the life list and has an age of 82 years. No other birders' activity is synchronized over such a large geographical area on an annual basis with a comparable level of organization. To top it off the results are published in a widely circulated journal, American Birds, forming a permanent record of wintering bird species and their numbers. I don't mean to overlook the count's inherent flaws. Anyone familiar with the count knows that only location and date are stable from year to year. Changes in habitat quality are recorded in crude fashion at best and observes are merely listed alphabetically with no hint of their differences in knowledge and experience. The truth of the matter is a statistician would drive himself to drinking trying to falsify null hypotheses with Christmas count data! But let's ignore these problems for the moment because my aim is to encourage and not to discourage participation. A friend whose knowledge and experience exceeds my < own recently wrote me and stated that he felt the value of Christinas counts dropped off sharply as the number of participants dropped below twenty. I feel this is a ballpark figure unless you, again, take into consideration observer quality, but his basic point is right. Ponder for a moment the fact that a count circle is 177 square miles in area. That's a very large amount of ground to cover in one day! It's possible for fewer than twenty observers to make a fairly accurate census of large birds which are airborne much of the day, buteos or geese for example. But what about tiny woodland species? We're kidding ourselves if we think a handful of observers can approach even a marginal sampling of their numbers in one day on such a large area. The Audubon Christinas Bird Count was designed with one purpose in mind: to establish a record of wintering bird populations and to use that record to track fluctuations in those populations. The importance of such a record (particularly in the tropics) can't be stressed enough, and the Audubon count can be an accurate one if interested folks will participate. There's a place for everyone, regardless of experience. Novice or "backyard" birders can play a very important role by counting familiar species and/or unfamiliar ones which are easily identified--all you need is binoculars and a field guide. Beginners can tag along with more seasoned birders and aid them by adding an extra pair of eyes. A REMINDER TO CHRISTMAS COUNT COMPILERS Christmas count bird records which affect the UTC Checklist (vagrant sightings, out-of-season reports, etc.) must be documented in The Spoonbill or detaiIs must be sent to one ' of the members of the OS's Checklist Committee if they are to be considered for acceptance as valid UTC records. No exceptionsI...The Checklist Cora-ittee