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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1925
Image 4
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1925 - Image 4. June 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 14, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6798/show/6797.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1925 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6798/show/6797

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1925 - Image 4, June 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 14, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6798/show/6797.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_006_004.jpg
Transcript •Si**' The Zephyr H. G. Wells predicts that eventually "Men will turn again with renewed interest to the animal world. In these disordered days, a stupid,' uncontrollable massacre of animal species goes on - from certain angles of vision it is a'thing almost more tragic, than human miseries. It is a strange thing in human history'to note how little has been done since the Bronze Age in taming/ using, befriending and appreciating the animal life about us. Mere witless killing whiah is called sport today will inevitably give place in a better educated world community to a modification of the primitive instincts that find expression in this way/ changing them to an interest not in the deaths/ but in the lives of beasts/ and leading to fresh and perhaps Very strange and beautiful attempts to befriend these pathetic, kindred lower creatures we no longer fear as enemies/ hate as rivals| or need as slaves." - Bulletin of Associated Mountaineering Clubs of North America. A State Bird for Texas In urging the adoption of the mockingbird as the state bird of Texas/'The Zephyr feels that it is espousing the cause of. a neighbor who/ having won fame abroad as a matchless singer, is ! certainly entitled to some recognition at home. Of course/ he is so familiar to all of us that he fails to stir the imagination as strongly as some rare or very elusive species often does/ but were we to pass him up in favor of some other bird/ we would show ourselves poor judges of value. To a citizen of some other state or nation/ the fact that Texas had chosen the martin/ the bluebird/ or the chickadee as a state bird/ Would cause only passing comment. But the mockingbird! Why," he is a celebrated character in places where other birds are only birds. ' Were he ever so rare, it would be good advertising to proclaim him our own. Surely the fact that he is'our most abundant and familiar songster entitles him to the honor/ and our state to the advantage, of his selection as the state bird of Texas. In- a speech delivered by Hon. John A. Rankin, of Mississippi/ the following tribute was paid to our gray coated Dixie Troubadour: "We dignify as a national emblem the eagle that soars and shrieks his screams of defiance from the seclusion of the crags; we perpetuate in verse and story the imaginary songs of the'mythical dying swan; we praise the songs of other birds - but," in my humble judgment," there is none that deserves more praise," credit or commendation at the hands of enlightened humanity than the peerless mockingbird/ America's greatest singer who enlivens the spirit of springtime with his tireless serenade and thrills eve-ry heart with his inspiring note of gladness, as he touches the golden harp of nature's sweetest song and 'stirs with love and hope the languid souls of listening men'". The matter of choosing colors for the club has been discussed casually on several occasions, but no vote has ever been taken on the subject. It is well to remember that the purpose is not to secure the brightest or "best looking" combination, but one that will convey something of the spirit and purpose of the Outdoor Nature Club. Soft blue and gray seem to make an ideal combination. Blue is the color of our state flower/ the blue- bonnet/ and of the bluebird,"emblem of happin6ss. Gray is the hue of our talented neighbor/ the mockingbird/ and of the drapery of moss that is so characteristic a feature of our Southern woodlands. The far curving canopy of the sky is either blue or gray/ save when the magic of the sunset temporarily splashes it with all the variety of nature's pigment pot. The union of blue and gray symbolizes the firm clasp of friendship and under-' standing," and united effort for the common good.