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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1970
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1970 - Image 1. November 1970. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6743/show/6735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1970). The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1970 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6743/show/6735

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1970 - Image 1, November 1970, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6743/show/6735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1970
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIV, No. 7, November 1970
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1970
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9855
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Note Incorrect volume number, XVIV, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f007_011_001.jpg
Transcript VOLUME XVIV, No. 7 November, 1970 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB, HOUSTON, TEXAS LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL RETURNS TO TEXAS CITY DIKE-by Noel Pettingell On Oetober 2? Ben Feltner observed what many local birders believe to be the third annual appearance of the same individual Lesser Black-backed Gull at the Texas City dike. When a dark-mantled gull was initially discovered at this site on March 1, 1969, it was at first thought to be a Western Gull. However, by March 28, when the gull was last seen that spring, the possibility that it could have been a Lesser Blaek-backed had been suggested. The controversy over which species the bird actually was continued until November 28, 1969, when presumably the same gull once again appeared at the dike. By March 21, 1970—the last appearance of the species until October 2?—it was generally agreed that the gull was a Lesser Black-backed whieh most likely had first strayed into our area in the fall of 1968, The bird apparently was a third-year sub-adult when it was first observed and photographed in March of 1969, and it is anticipated that more definitive color photos can be obtained if the gull remains in the Texas City area until next spring. Likewise, birders who have not yet had the opportunity of adding this rare North American visitor to their life lists now have another ohanee to do so. To my knowledge there has never been a documented occurrence of the Western Gull in Texas and only these three previous sight records of vagrant dark-backed gulls in the state; Great Blaek-backed Gull at Rockport February 22-27, 1949, and February 23, 1953. Lesser Black-baeked Gull at Port Aransas March 28, 1952. Previous references to the Texas City dike gull appeared in the following issues of the Spoonbill: March 1969 (p. 5) April " (p. 5) May " (p. 7) June 1969 (p. 5) Dec. 1969 (pp. 4-6) Aug, " (p, 2) Jan. 1970 (pp. 2-3) Nov, " (pp. 1-5) Apr. 1970 (pp. k-5) ATTRACTING HUMMINGBIRDS-by Maxine Wenger My attempts at luring hummers into our yard with commercial feeders have never been successful. I have used two types of feeders as well as open small jars filled with sweetened water. When the hummers started coming again to our neighborhood in August, it was the trumpet vine and turkseap they came to visit. I decided to put a false trumpet "flower" on the trumpet vine and fill it with sugar water. A couple of plastic peppers, red and yellow in color, were found at a nearby dime store and easily installed on the vine. The hummers fell for it and soon favored the red and yellow plastic "flowers" over the real orange ones. Next I installed an orange-colored plastic squash, as it was easier to clean and required fewer refills. Later, feeders made from an orange, apple, pomegranate and tomato were hung from our roof overhang by windows. All have been successful, and we've enjoyed watching the birds feed at very close range. The birds seem to favor the feeders with two or three holes cut in the side, and some have perched while feeding. At times we have seen around 15 birds in the back yard fussing over the feeders. The birds started to diminish in number around mid-October when the first cool fronts came in. As of November 1 we still have two or three birds, perhaps more. Threeneighbor families have installed fruit feeders and report similar activity in their yards. So far, only five mature mal* Rubythroats have been sighted, the rest being female and immatures. Twice we've glimpled rufous colored birds, but they didn't stay long