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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926
Image 2
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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 2. November 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6733

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 2, November 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_011_002.jpg
Transcript The Zephyr Page #2 Notes and News. The American Society of Landscape Architects has recently Issued a statement of policies favored by that body as to parks .and related matters. One of the most interesting paragraphs reads: "The American Society of Landscape Architects believe that additions should be made to the number of our National and State Parks in order that examples of our most characteristic and rapidly decreasing natural scenery may be preserved against encroachment of economic forces". We are indebted to Charles L. Bernheimer for a copy of his book on Rainbow Bridge - the story of the author's adventures and discoveries in the desert lands of our American Southwest. This is a decidedly worthwhile addition to our library. Lovers of birds will enjoy an article in the September-Octobe. number of Parks & Recreation entitled "Birds of the Mississippi Watershed", by Paul B. Riis. Mr. Riis has charge of that section of the magazine devoted to the conservation of \?ild life, and his work adds much to the interest and value of Parks & Recreation. Nawona Adelle Taylor, a thirteen year old school girl of Markham, Texas, won first prize, (350.00, In the Tree Essay Contest sponsored by Holland's Magazine as class "'III of its Campaign for Civic Beautification. "Trees as Friend3 of Man", was the title of the winning essay, which is published in Holland's for October, and is well worth reading. From the pupils of Miss Julia Beazley's class, at Lamar School, comes a most interesting series of letters, giving the ideas of the young people in regard to a state bird for Texas. As w as to be expected, the mockingbird is the young folks' favorite, and they give some very logical reasons for his selection. As Yuletide draws near, outdoor clubs throughout the land are again 'calling to public' attention the inevitable necessity of using cultivated plants and artificial substitutes for holly In Christmas decorations. There. Is still some wild holly left, of course, but it is unthinkable that the American peop le should wish to destroy that pitiful remnant before necessity forces them to use substitutes. • And so again the slogan is: Save our native American holly - Use substitutes In Christmas decorating," This isn't the season when songbirds are at their best, but, according to radio listeners, birds are on the air in song, if not singing. And here's the evidence: "Like a meadowlark." "Bye-bye, Blackbirdl" "When the red, red robin comes bob-bob-bobbin' along," And when Texas has chosen our gray-coated Dixie troubadour as its state bird, all the world will "Listen to the mockingbird". In regard to the scheme of Idaho sugar beet ihterests to grab a part of Yellowstone National Park, The Outlook says: Americans, keep the looters out." "Aye! Ayel" say we*