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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926
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The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 1. November 1926. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 15, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1926). The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6732

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926 - Image 1, November 1926, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 15, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6734/show/6732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Zephyr, Vol. 3, No. 11, November 1926
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1926
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 29
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9624
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f029_011_001.jpg
Transcript THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. November, 1926 Vol..3, No.11 There's a voice in the dawn, Word upon liquid word, Heard in a dream, then gone -- The mockingbird. No reed pipe of Pan Ever such music made; No clear flute of man Ever thus played. So bid me ope my eyes, Bird, when the sunlight nears, That I may daily rise To the song of the spheres I — Clinton Scollard, Sun (N.Y.). Countless thousands of places in this country and abroad have become famous for their magnificent trees, which silently lend their beauty and shade and add to the joy of living. Who would think of Cambridge without associating with it the memory of the magnificent elms that lend their welcoming shade? Throughout the South, our magnolias and live oaks hold an equally important place in the hearts of our people. Our state highways demand our first attention, although every thoroughfare leading into Houston should be beautified with judicious planting. No investment of like- amount would do so much to give pleasure and comfort to all our citizens, as well as the tourist and stranger, and at the same time -advertise the merits of our soil and climate, bringing us dividends on the investment of invaluable worth. It would be neither necessary nor desirable to plant these roadsides with rare exotics or trees and flowers difficult or expensive, since we have in our ov/n native woodland and prairies an abundance of subjects equally beautiful, which merely ask our permission to grow and flourish In the congenial places they should occupy. Careful study should be given to determine the proper places for planting those that thrive best in our various soils and taking advantage of the great possibilities offered by the particular local conditions and situations, as it is always safe to conform the planting to a natural or informal style in which the natural beauty of the landscape may be brought out in harmony with the surroundings. While stately avenues of trees may often be used effectively in places, the roadsides may be further embellished with gaillardias, bluebonnets, wild roses, native holly, yupon and dogwoods, and the endless variety of beautiful native shrubs. — Edward Teas.