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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 1, May 1975
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 1, May 1975 - Image 1. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6699/show/6689.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 1, May 1975 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6699/show/6689

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 1, May 1975 - Image 1, May 1975, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/6699/show/6689.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 1, May 1975
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. I, May 1975
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9860
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f022_005_001.jpg
Transcript Volume XXV, No May, 1975 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUl? 'OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB, HOUSTON, TEXAS HYBRID VISITORS Some lucky birders saw, almost within a week of each other, both Brewster's and Lawrence's warblers at High Island. Details on both are in the Clearing House Notes. (A goodly number of observers saw the Lawrence's warbler, which obligingly stayed in the same locale for apparently about a week). Since both are such unusual birds for our area, the following information we hope will be of interest. From Bird Life of Texas, Oberholser, Kincaid: "The Blue-winged Warbler and the very closely related Golden-winged Warbler breed in, and migrate through, virtually the same habitat, and their geographic distributions coincide closely (although the Blue- wlngnests a bit farther south in a few localities). The stage Is thus set for hybridization; in actual practice, Interbreeding between the two species has produced what is probably the most famous set of hybrids known among wild birds. These hybrids are of two main forms: Brewster's Warbler (white throat, belly) and Lawrence's Warbler (black or gray throat, yellow under parts). "Within Texas the "dominant" Brewster's has been sighted (up to 1972) along the coast in Galveston, Aransas, San Patricio, and Hidalgo counties; Inland, in Travis County. The "recessive" Lawrence's has been seen in Travis, Chambers, Galveston, Aransas, and Nueces counties. "Nesting, flight, and foraging behavior of the Blue-wing and of both hybrid forms is very similar to that of the Goldenwing. Analysis of stomach Contents reveals a simi- ar diet of beetles, bugs, files, ants, and caterpillars, together with many other insects, their eggs and larvae, as well as some spiders." From Audubon Land Bird Guide, Pough: "These birds are somewhat variable in appearance. Brewster bydrids may have the gray back more or less washed with olive-green, and the white under parts may show yellow, especially on the breast. The wing bars may be broadly yellow or white. The duller females usually have more green on the back and more yellow on the under parts than the average male. Lawrence hybrids run closer to type, but the wing bars may be broad and either yellow or white, or narrowly white. Females are like female blue-wlngeds wl-th dusky olive instead of black cheek and throat markings and occasionally a broad yellow wing bar. Some Individuals have a song like the Go Iden-w1nged's, others like the Blue-wlnged's, or the song may be a mixture of the two, each bird having its own variation. Generally Brewster's sing more I Ike Golden-wingeds, Lawrence's I l-ke Blae-wlngeds. "Hybrids in nature are rare, and when they occur it is usually between closely related species. Among North American birds the most notable hybrids are produced when Golden-winged and Blue-winged warblers Interbreed. The bird that results from the initial cross Is different from either parent. "Every normal living cell has within it pairs of bodies known as chromosomes, each of which contains a series of individual inheritance units known as genes. Each pair of genes controls the development of color, form or other attributs of some part of the body of the individual. As one gene In each pair came from the male parent and the other from the female, the genes for a given character may or may not be alike in the two chromosomes of a given pair. When they are alike they jointly regulate the development of a given character; i.e., they pull together. Byt when a gene from one par- 3nt is entirely different from the corresponding gene from the other, one gene Is com- nonly stronger and dominates. The stronger is called the "dominant" and the weaker the "recessive" gene. The color gene of the blue-winged warbler which produces a plain throat is always dominant when paired with a go Iden-winged's black throat-color gene: therefore, the